» Top 10 Roundup: Most Popular Wedding Business Tips

A lot has changed in the wedding industry over the last 10 years, which has challenged wedding professionals to change with it. Since WeddingWire launched in 2007, we’ve shared marketing advice, expert education, and technology tips to help you manage and grow your business. While the rise of technology has dramatically changed the ways that wedding professionals connect with and book potential clients, many of the core principles of running a successful wedding business remain the same.

Here is a list of our top 10 most read articles of all time, containing some of our most essential business tips, insights, and marketing advice that are still just as relevant today:

#1 – Why Do Couples Ask About Price First?

#2 – Top Wedding Trends for 2017

#3 – 5 Ways You’re Losing The Sale

#4 – Business Branding: Consider Your Color!

#5 – How Are Weddings Changing? WeddingWire 2017 Newlywed Survey

#6 – What to Do When They Don’t Respond

#7 – How to Deal with Pricing Questions

#8 – 6 Ways to Optimize Your Website for Leads

#9 – How to Respond to a Negative Review

#10 – How Should You Politely Tell A Client ‘I Don’t Do That’?

» 4 Easy Steps to Content Creation as a Wedding Pro

When it comes to marketing and PR for your company, content creation is king – especially if you’re the one creating it. It’s no secret that Google loves fresh, well-written and continually updated new content on a blog, rewarding it with higher rankings and greater chance for attention.

If establishing yourself as an expert is part of your master business plan, one of the expectations is that you will provide new, enriching content regularly via your own blog and through partnerships with other media outlets. So how do you create exciting and valuable new content as a wedding pro?

Outline your goals. Ask yourself, “What do I hope to accomplish by focusing more of my time on content creation?” You want to make sure you have a purpose and it’s clear what sort of Return on Investment (ROI) will qualify your content strategy as a success.

content creation

 

Begin creating a content calendar. Determine where you’re posting – which social media, blogs, and guest writing opportunities – as well as how often, keeping in mind that your goals should be manageable.

Figure out what you’ll write about. How, you ask? Host a brainstorming session with your team. Take notes after wedding days on scenarios you can turn into a list of tips for couples. Carve out a brief amount of time weekly to review mainstream press, like your local daily newspaper or The New York Times. Then ask yourself how it can relate to the event industry. Cover company news and industry news. Provide valuable content to your audience with the intention of getting closer to your goals.

Track your progress and revisit statistics quarterly. Ensure that your content remains aligned with your goals. Review your responsibilities and commitments and ask yourself if it’s still feasible to create as much content as you’re doing. Use your analytics to see what posts (social media, blog, others) end up with the most engagements and click-throughs to your site. The best plan is one that evolves and addresses what your audience wants and needs.

Content creation requires commitment and analysis. Done well, it can yield new business opportunities, increased attention to your work, and advancement in the industry of your recognition as an expert. Make a plan, review your goals and achievements, and don’t be afraid to take the leap – start building your content portfolio today.

 

Exclusive Wedding PR Education Expert for WeddingWire Meghan Ely is the owner of wedding PR agency OFD Consulting. She also leads the newly launched OFD Collective, a membership based community of wedding professionals seeking PR education and publicity opportunities for their business.

» How to Set Your Prices Based on Your Value

I was just at the Photo Booth Expo, and as you can imagine, there were many, many different types of equipment there. Features varied, as did prices. I was speaking with a couple that owns seven photo booths, and they were considering a new mirror booth. There were a couple of different ones they were considering, but one was a lot more expensive than the other. While the quality of the more expensive one was evident, they were torn on which one to buy.

 

Customers buy value, not price. 

My advice? No matter which one they decide to buy, they should charge the same price to rent it out. My statement confused them, as the more expensive booth was more than double the price to buy. Customers aren’t going to have them side-by-side. They’re not going to know what you didn’t buy. They’re only going to know what you bring to their wedding or event. And, most importantly, they’re not paying you for the equipment. They’re paying you for the outcome, which is the fun their guests are going to have at their wedding or event.

This is true for every product and service. While you need to know your costs, you charge for the outcome. Photographers and videographers have many choices of equipment. Most couples wouldn’t be able to tell the difference between photos shot with a Canon camera versus a Nikon. DJs and bands have many choices of equipment. Most customers couldn’t tell the difference between JBL speakers and Bose. Caterers have infinite choices of kitchen equipment, yet the customer gives no thought to how the food is cooked, just that it wows their guests.

 

How do you set your prices?

When you’re deciding how much to charge for your products and services, how do you go about it? Do you take your costs and charge a multiple (3X cost, 5X cost)? Do you even know your costs? Have you taken into consideration your overhead (rent, utilities, insurance, etc.)? Whether it’s envelopes, toilet paper or paper clips, the money to pay for that has to come from your gross sales.

 

If you don’t value your time, no one will.

Too many wedding pros undervalue their time—do you? Do you know how much time it takes to perform your services? Have you included the time it takes to answer emails, take phone calls, and meet in-person (or virtually)? I was sitting with a DJ who was lamenting to me about another inquiry that asked for his “5-hour package.” We started talking about how much time he actually spends on each wedding, from the initial inquiry through any appointments, planning meetings/calls, editing music for each introduction and their first dance, planning their playlist (and do-not-play list) – then the packing up and travel time to their wedding, the wedding itself and then packing up, the time getting home and unpacking. He figured that it was between 35 and 40 hours.

How much is your 5-hour package?

So, I suggested that the next time someone asks about his 5-hour package, he reply, something like this: “Thanks so much for giving me the opportunity to show you how much fun I can make your wedding. I’d love to pack your dance floor, and have your guests saying it was the best wedding they’ve ever attended. I don’t have a 5-hour package, but I’d love to tell you about my 35-hour package – the 5 hours you and your guests will see – and the other 30 hours that I’ll be investing, before your wedding, to ensure its success, which you can see from our dozens of fantastic reviews.” 

Are you charging only for the time you spend at their wedding? Or, are you taking into account all of the other time you’re going to invest in them? Too many wedding and event pros set their prices based upon what someone else is charging. How do you know their prices are correct? You don’t. Do you know their costs? No. Do you have the same overhead? No. What if their prices are too low (as they often are)? Don’t chase them to the bottom.

Over the years, I’ve challenged many of you to justify your current prices. Can you raise you prices now? Not sure? Ask yourself this: If your prices were 5% higher, last year, how many of your customers would have said “No”? If the answer is none, or very few, your prices are too low. You’re undervaluing yourself. When you get to the point where some are saying “No,” but there would be others who would say, “Yes,” to the higher price, then you can still raise your prices. When you get to the point where too many would be saying “No,” and others would also say, “No,” then you’ve gone too far.

 

Raising your rates isn’t as difficult as it seems.

Early this year I got an email from a wedding pro: “I put one of your suggestions into action right after the seminar, and increased my servicing fees by $15 per hour, and NOT ONE PERSON objected. Many thanks from my family, because it really was that easy to put an extra $1500 in our family pocket, which means winter holiday in Mexico, NOT Vancouver Island LOL.” Another wedding pro, a DJ, doubled his prices during one of my presentations, and the next day he sold two weddings at the higher prices! He hadn’t raised his prices in years, and had gotten comfortable selling at the lower price, because it was easy. Now, he finds it just as easy to sell at the higher price.

 

How much money are you leaving on the table?

Every dollar you raise your prices is extra profit. Conversely, every dollar you discount your prices is profit you’re giving away. Take a good, hard look at your pricing structure, then ask yourself those questions about how many would say. “No” to higher prices. Next, see how much more profit you can gain. I look forward to hearing your stories of success!

 

alan bergThis article was written by WeddingWire Education Guru Alan Berg, CSP. Alan has over 20
years experience in wedding related sales and marketing, and is an author, business consultant, a member of the National Speakers Association, and the wedding & event industry’s only Certified Speaking Professional®. Learn more at alanberg.com

» The Business Case for Being an Open Book

While it may seem prudent to hold all of your secrets close, there’s a certain level of respect that comes with a company that prides itself in transparency. However, being an open book isn’t as easy as simply blasting your latest company news on Facebook. Transparency is rooted in a deep regard for competitors and industry peers. The aim is to foster open communication.

 

So, what exactly does it mean to be an open book?

Be open with what’s going on in your company—both good or bad. In the past, I’ve earned business simply by letting people know we were low on bookings when other planners were already booked for their date. At the same time, it means being open with clients, competitors and the rest of your network about changes that may affect them, like the addition of a new staff member or a new product in stock.

 

What’s the ideal relationship with competitors?

It can be tough to open up to other companies that share your ideals and target the same prospective clients. However, with a positive attitude, two competing companies can work together to share best practices for their specialty. This can be mutually beneficial for everyone involved. Don’t worry about losing clients to a competitor. In fact, don’t even think about them as competitors. In the wedding industry, there will always be engaged couples looking to book. In our market, we have a group of planners that meet quarterly to discuss our goals, share resources and encouragement. We are always happy to celebrate someone else’s successes!

 

What should you keep to yourself?

Although it’s great to be transparent about company changes and major goals, there are some things you’ll want to keep to yourself. For example, if you’re having problems with an employee or another vendor, be cautious about sharing too many details. Keep people’s names and reputations out of it and, if you must ask for advice, do so anonymously.

When it comes down to it, it’s entirely up to you how transparent you are with your company. Just know that clients, creative partners, staff and everyone else will respect your commitment to openness and honesty.

 

This post was written by Jennifer Taylor. Jennifer Taylor is the owner of Taylor’d Events Group, a planning firm that specializes in celebrations of all kinds in the Pacific Northwest and Maui. She is also the creator of The Taylor’d Plan, a self-administered class for wedding planners who are new to the industry and looking to grow and develop their skills.

» How to Make the Most of Engagement Season

wedding professional engagement season vendor

While other business owners may delight in the pre-holiday or back-to-school shopping seasons, the undisputed champ of sales for wedding professionals is engagement season. WeddingWire calculates that about 40% of couples who will be engaged in the next 12 months will do so between November and February.

These quick best practices will help you maximize this crucial time and set yourself up for a productive wedding season.

Freshen up your online presence: Couples these days are accustomed to shopping for services online, so it’s uber-important to put your best foot forward across the Web. That includes your website, social media, WeddingWire storefront and even your email signature. Be sure your branding is consistent throughout and that you make it as easy as possible to contact you. Don’t force couples to hunt for your email or social networks—be sure this is on the very first page of your website. Have a couple of friends put fresh eyes on your sites and social media to be sure you don’t have any broken links, confusing wording or blurry images.

Audit your social: While we’re on the subject, now isn’t the time to neglect your social media accounts! Couples will often use your social media to not only see some of your most recent work, but also get a feel for your personality. They’re looking for partners on their wedding day, not just someone to come in, provide a service and leave. With that said, don’t be a robot on social. Share your best photos, but also share what drew you to the couple, what you loved about the day or why that particular photo is one of your favorites. Be sure to get permission from couples to share and tag them (as well as the rest of the vendor team) if they’re also on social media.

Keep your calendar up-to-date: As couples are reaching out to you for consultations, they’ll want to know that you’re available for their wedding date and location. Take a few minutes to fill in your calendar with as many details as you can about your upcoming wedding season, including building in time for site visits, travel and administrative tasks as needed. While it’s great to be busy, you don’t want to lose business because you’ve incorrectly estimated the time commitment for future clients.

Consider an auto-email feature: In a rapid response world, sometimes 24 to 48 hours just won’t do. As couples fill out your contact form during engagement season, it might be best to automate an email that instantly responds. Beyond showing that you’re responsive right away, use this email to smartly promote your social channels, work that you’re most proud of or even an awesome piece of wedding planning content you really love. Give it some personality, but be sure it’s short, sweet and helping you meet your business goals.

wedding professional engagement season wedding vendor

Prove your credibility: It’s one thing for you to say you’re amazing, efficient and easy to work with, but it’s a whole other thing for someone else to say it. That’s why so many couples rely on business reviews before contacting potential wedding professionals. Make it a goal to amass at least five additional reviews from couples and other professionals you’ve recently worked with this engagement season. Don’t be shy about asking for them—newlyweds love to talk about their wedding and you were an important part of why it was so special!

Nail your first impression: Once you’ve set up a time to meet with a potential client, the real work of engagement season begins. Chances are, the couple’s had a chance to peruse your social media, your website and your storefront, so return the favor by learning a little about the couple as well. Check out their social media profiles if you can, and look into any information they may have included in their emails to you—the type of wedding they’d like, what they enjoyed about your work, their venue, etc. Be prepared to discuss the latest wedding trends in your industry and show a curated collection of your recent projects. So, if you know the couple will be wed at a fancy downtown hotel, don’t show up with a portfolio full of barn weddings you’ve done and vice versa.

Learn even more about how to nail engagement season with this fact sheet.

» WeddingWire Networking Night San Diego

This week, local wedding professionals gathered at the Handlery Hotel San Diego for WeddingWire Networking Night San Diego!

At the Networking Night, San Diego pros had the opportunity to enjoy a stunning venue space, network with other local professionals across all service categories, and meet members of the WeddingWire team. Plus, they learned more about building relationships in an industry with little-to-no repeat customers during a brief presentation by WeddingWire Contributor, Bethel Nathan.

Thank you to all the wonderful pros who joined us! We’re excited to share highlights from the event including the educational presentation, our latest issue of WedInsights, and photos from the enjoyable evening below.

We would like to say a special thank you to the amazing event partners who helped make the evening possible:

Finally, we’re excited to announce the winner of our WeddingWire Prize Pack give away – congrats to Jennifer of The Crossings at Carlsbad!

WWNN San Diego wedwire-16 wedwire-41 wedwire-83 wedwire-94 wedwire-123

» WeddingWire Networking Night Fort Lauderdale

This week, local wedding professionals gathered at The Venue Fort Lauderdale for WeddingWire Networking Night Fort Lauderdale!

At the Networking Night, Fort Lauderdale pros had the opportunity to enjoy a stunning venue space, network with other local professionals across all service categories, and meet members of the WeddingWire team. Plus, they learned more about local industry statistics and how to better reach engaged couples through social media during a brief presentation by WeddingWire’s Regional Manager of Customer Success, Megan Hayes.

Thank you to all the wonderful pros who joined us! We’re excited to share highlights from the event including the educational presentation, our latest issue of WedInsights, and amazing photos from the evening below.

We would like to say a special thank you to the amazing event partners who helped make the evening possible:

Finally, we’re excited to announce the winner of our WeddingWire Prize Pack give away – congrats to Yamille of DoubleTree Ocean Point Resort & Spa!

WeddingWire Networking Night Fort Lauderdale 2016 weddinwire-partigliani-photography-the-venue-ft-lauderdale-13  weddinwire-partigliani-photography-the-venue-ft-lauderdale-35 weddinwire-partigliani-photography-the-venue-ft-lauderdale-43 weddinwire-partigliani-photography-the-venue-ft-lauderdale-79weddinwire-partigliani-photography-the-venue-ft-lauderdale-56

» How to Get Your Fill of Vitamin D While Working Over the Summer

Pro to Pro Insights

Leila Lewis, photo by Valorie Darling PhotographyThis post was written by Leila Lewis of Be Inspired PR. As a business school graduate from Santa Clara University, Leila (Khalil) Lewis’ career began in publishing, where she worked in marketing and editorial roles for business and lifestyle publications. Since transitioning into the wedding business in 2004, Leila has over 10 years of wedding marketing experience under her belt, and is the industry’s go-to for wedding public relations services, brand development and business consulting.

With the summer air and the sunshine calling your name, it can be difficult to sit in your office all day while the gorgeous days pass you by – especially as friends and family take weekend trips you know you’ll be missing! While the weather in most of the country is at its best, we often find ourselves chained to our computers or workstations in the midst of the busy wedding season.

How to Get Your Fill of Vitamin D While Working Over the SummerAfraid of missing out on sweet summertime? Never fear! Here’s how you can do everything you can to get your fill of vitamin D while working in an office.

Have a walking meeting

Instead of just meeting in your office, get moving! Sitting at a desk or workstation for 8+ hours a day is unhealthy, and the fresh air and natural sunlight will help you clear your head and revive your energy for the rest of the day. Our office is on the luckier side – we’re located in Manhattan Beach, just a short walk away from the ocean – but you can take a spin around your neighborhood to keep your blood flowing. Need to take notes? Consider recording your meeting on your smartphone to write down your to-do items later.

Change up the environment

Staring at the same wall or out the same window all day every day can be difficult and make work feel stagnant. Switch up your location from time to time as an easy fix. Find a café or coffee shop (with reliable Wi-Fi!) and take your office to a new location with an outside patio. You can also meet with clients in cafés or restaurants closer to their homes or offices, which benefits both of you and makes the situation feel less formal. You’ve got the sun, your work, and, most importantly, coffee – what more do you need?

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» Infographic: What’s the Q? Best Practices for LGBTQ Wedding Language

We’re excited to share our latest infographic, which shares highlights from our recent webinar about the best practices for wedding language when working with LGBTQ couples!

It’s very important to understand modern LGBTQ terms and how they differ in definition, such as sexual orientation, sexual identity, and gender. By taking the time to understand the history of these terms and the best practices for LGBTQ wedding language, you will make your clients feel much more comfortable when working with your business. You’ll also be more likely to get more leads using inclusive language that welcomes all types of couples to your website.

Learn more by reviewing the infographic’s tips, provided by WeddingWire Education Contributor Bernadette Smith, President of the Gay Wedding Institute

What's the Q? Best Practices for Wedding Language

» Risk Management: Identifying Significant Risks

Pro to Pro Insights

Jennifer Taylor, Taylor'd Events GroupThis post was written by Jennifer Taylor. Jennifer Taylor is the owner of Taylor’d Events Group, a planning firm that specializes in celebrations of all kinds in the Pacific Northwest and Maui.

Nobody wants to face a crisis during an event – that’s a fact. However, that’s all the more reason to prepare in advance and develop a risk management plan. That way, if things go awry, you’ll be ready to mitigate the repercussions and bounce back.

Risk Management: Identifying Significant RisksThe key to a solid risk management plan is open communication between all parties involved. This includes the clients, their parents, the venue coordinator, and all of the wedding professionals on the event team.

Each event is unique, so it may make sense to develop a standard crisis plan that can be tailored to the situation at hand. For example, uncooperative weather is a common worry for outdoor events, so a rain plan is something that can be planned in advance. However, for each event, you’ll need to be familiar with the venue so that you can tweak the rain plan if necessary.

The same goes for other potential risks – use your foresight to think about what could possibly go wrong and find a solution before it does. Worried about an elaborate cake surviving the summer heat? Ensure that there is a nice and cool place for it to stay safe and sound. Concerned by a vendor’s lack of communication? Draw up a phone tree with everyone’s day-of phone numbers so each person can be reached.

Once there is a plan in place, send it along to the rest of the event team to ensure that everyone is on the same page. Communicate your expectations and what you define as a successful. Be sure that everyone understands what kind of constraints they are operating under, as it may have an effect on the level of damage control necessary. An event is truly a team effort, so include all involved parties in the crisis plan so that each has their own role that will contribute to a successful event, no matter what happens.

It will help to schedule a monthly call with the rest of the event team just to check in on everyone’s progress and ensure that everyone has what he or she needs. This is a great way to not only keep everyone accountable and avoid risk, but also to build a better camaraderie between members.

You may not even need to use your risk management plans – that’s the good news! However, if something does happen, you’ll be confident in knowing that you’re fully prepared to handle the crisis and lessen the damage that can come from it.

» Wedding PR: How to Craft an Award-Winning Submission

WeddingWire Education Expert

Meghan Ely

Meghan Ely is the owner of wedding marketing and wedding pr firm OFD Consulting. As a highly sought-after speaker in the wedding industry, she is the exclusive Wedding PR Education Expert for WeddingWire as well as the national Communications and Marketing Director for WIPA. To learn how OFD Consulting can assist you, as well as more about our new wedding PR kits, please visit us today.

Whether you realize it or not, awards should play a prominent role in your wedding PR campaign. They not only provide brand recognition, but they also speak to your expertise and act as a source of outside credibility. Winning a few quality awards can grow your revenue, in addition to boosting morale in the office.

Wedding PR: How to Craft an Award-Winning Submission“That’s great. But where do I apply?”

The number one key to a successful award application is to only submit to those that fit your business. Sending applications out to any and all awards you can find is a waste of time, as well as damaging to your integrity. Remember – every story is different, so don’t assume that you’re a fit for every award that your competitor has. Stick to the ones that your company truly qualifies for and put all of your effort into it.

Aim high, but be realistic as well. While you certainly may deserve some of the top-tier awards, you’ll need to work on building your brand recognition before you reach that point. Start out by applying to local and regional awards before going for the larger national ones – this way, you can start developing your award-winning portfolio.

“Then what?”

Once you’ve narrowed your focus down to one or a few awards, be sure to read and reread the guidelines. One mistake may cost you the win, so do your due diligence and know what is required for a completed submission. Give yourself enough time to complete the application and submit it prior to the deadline.

Map out your approach prior to writing – the last thing you want is to fill out an application online and lose it from faulty Internet or one wrong click. When writing up the copy, it’s best to use your own voice to make everything flow together into a coherent story. This means that you need to “speak” with the judges – stay away from jargon, acronyms, and other terms that may confuse them. Don’t assume that they know everything, so connect the dots and make it easier for them to understand. Using facts and figures, as well as images, are great ways to support your story.

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» 5 Ways to Take Time for You

5 Ways to Take Time for YouAll month long we’ve been shining a light on wedding planning stress – for both couples and our pros. As we head into the summer months, more and more of your weekends are going to be busy with weddings and all the preparation that comes along with the busy season, so we’re here to help keep you cool, calm, and collected.

We just celebrated WeddingWire’s Official Day Without Planning for our couples, but since we know you can’t always take a full day off from your busy schedule, here are five ways to take time for you!

Hit the gym

Even if exercise is already part of your normal routine, it’s important to balance your mental exertion with physical exertion. Break a sweat running on the treadmill, meditating in hot yoga, or taking a long walk before or after work. If you spend a lot of your day on your feet already, try another activity like swimming or cycling to work different muscles and break the monotony.

Head to the spa

What better way to blow off some steam than some R&R? Whether you go in for a quick manicure/pedicure (men can enjoy those, too!) or schedule yourself a massage to loosen up the knots in your back, spend some time focusing on yourself. Even a quick visit to the hot tub or steam room can help you relax and reflect on your personal life so you can hit the ‘reset’ button for a while!

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