» How to Maintain a Consistent Brand Voice

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andy-ebon-squareThe following post was written by WeddingWire Education Expert Andy Ebon. Andy is the Founder of Wedding University and The Wedding Marketing Blog, and is an International Public Speaker, Writer and Consultant based in Las Vegas. Andy travels across North America and beyond, presenting to Associations, Wedding Industry Conferences, Regional Gatherings, and Local Meetings.

Continuity and consistency are first cousins in the execution of your marketing. Continuity is using marketing tools—like your WeddingWire storefront, website, social media content, logo, etc.— in a cohesive and recognizable manner. Basically, you want to be “you” across every potential client touch point. Consistency, on the other hand, is taking action with regularity. In other words: Being consistent with the use of those tools. This can mean posting to Facebook twice a day, blogging twice weekly, being in touch with your contacts at routine intervals and being sure that your advertising is in tune with most couples’ wedding planning journey.

The combination of updating with continuity and consistency, your brand and the company message forge ahead, leaving the impression of a progressive company both with engaged couples and your peers.

Remember, marketing is everything that touches the prospect or client—not just advertising or social media. Here are a few ways to maintain a consistent brand voice:

Keep it Short and Professional Over the Phone

For some couples, your phone manners is one of the first impressions of your business. Whether you are a one-person micro business or a company with many employees, the way anyone answers the phone should sound the same.

XYZ Company, this is Andy. How can I help you?

Simple, clear, to the point. If you are not the right person to assist, do your utmost to connect the caller with the correct person.

The best example I can offer for a smaller business is a catering professional in Atlanta. She updated her voicemail every day. Her script would go something like this:

Good day and thanks for calling. This is Shelley. Today is Tuesday, March 14th. I’ll be out of the office on client appointments this morning, but you can expect a callback after lunch. If your call requires immediate attention, don’t hesitate to text me at 777-777-7777 and I will do my best to your reach you even sooner. Thanks for calling, and make it a great day!

And, of course, when she was back in the office, the message would be updated. This kind of continuity is spectacular.

Keep Your Delivery and Set-Up Crew Sharp

When your staff members or delivery crew arrive at a venue, how are they dressed? Be sure that even this aspect reflects your company’s personality. A no-fuss option is a company t-shirt or polo-style shirt, accompanied by jeans or slacks.

The moment a venue representative sees you “in uniform,” you’ve broken the ice and are part of the team. Make sure you supply your crew with two or three shirts, so the uniform is always clean and ready to go.

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Don’t Slack with Print Media

The most frequent mistake I see in print ads or flyers is poor headlines. Your company name is not a headline. Your company slogan or favorite hashtag is not a headline. A headline is a phrase, usually accompanied by a visual, crafted to encourage the prospect to read the rest of the ad.

Avoid cliche words such as perfect, dream, unique, awesome and the like. It’s not just about your ad, but the other ads in a publication. Do your utmost to avoid verbiage you recognize in other ads. Make sure the ad is specific to your business and is told in your brand voice.

Are You Wasting Time with Social Media?

It’s always a good idea to periodically evaluate your approach to social media. The first thing to ask yourself is, “Am I using this to its fullest? Should I just drop it or revive it?” You also want to be honest about whether or not your social media content is helping potential clients and peers learn more about your brand personality.

If you are not using a social media platform frequently enough, then make it go away. If you are not measuring social media success across-the-board, then start. If you are not using analytics tools, such as those provided by WeddingWire, get going. Failure to ask these questions could mean you’re spending precious time on platforms that aren’t performing for you or just aren’t enjoyable to you. Your audience can tell when you’re just going through the motions, so be sure you’re invested in whichever platforms you choose.

Speaking of choosing social media platforms, it is easy to find the shiny, new object. Over time, you can wind up with 10 or more social media accounts. It’s far wiser to review what you are really using and the delete those that you don’t update or haven’t managed to engage meaningfully. You’ll usually find that about five platforms are serving you well. If a couple are underused, get them going. Settle in with platforms that really serve you and be solid on the frequency that works for your business.

Get Visual

We live in a highly visual society, so be sure your brand visuals are consistent with your brand voice. This means featuring a diverse variety of couples on your website, storefront, social media and advertising. It also means reviewing images a couple of times a year. Delete some and replace them with newer ones. Keeping your photos current is a reflection of staying up to date with style. Aging wedding dresses and decor do not reflect well on your company.

Typeface About-Face

Don’t forget fonts in your marketing brand evaluation. If you haven’t already, select a few that complement your logo design. Your choices of typeface should be limited about two on a single page. The eye has a difficult time adjusting to more than that. Have a sense about font sizes and make sure they work on all kinds of hardware: Smart phones, tablets and computers.

What Else To Consider

Each company has other factors to consider in continuity and consistency. Add to this list and revisit your thinking. When you review and refresh, it will move your business forward. This should be a regular activity to surpass the competition.

» Wedding PR: Crafting Your Personal Brand

WeddingWire Education Expert

Meghan Ely

Meghan Ely is the owner of wedding marketing and wedding pr firm OFD Consulting. As a highly sought-after speaker in the wedding industry, she is the exclusive Wedding PR Education Expert for WeddingWire as well as the national Communications and Marketing Director for WIPA. To learn how OFD Consulting can assist you, as well as more about our new wedding PR kits, please visit us today.

While you may be familiar with big brand names (think Apple and Nike), ask yourself what you’re doing to build your own brand. That’s right – a personal brand captures your personality and tells people you are an expert in a certain area.

Wedding PR: Crafting Your Personal BrandThe stronger your personal brand is, the more you’ll be respected as an industry leader, which certainly has a direct impact on a business if you’re an entrepreneur. That being said, you don’t need to own your own business to build a personal brand – all you need is a good idea of who you are and where your values lie.

First Things First

Before anything, you’ll have to ask yourself a few questions to really get an idea of how you want to portray your brand. What kind of adjectives would you use to describe yourself? How do you want to project yourself to other people? What are some of the things that you view as most important in your life?

Keep in mind that the answers to these questions will define the parameters for your branding, so it’s best to give them a lot of thought rather than to skim over it.

Know Your People

Ask yourself: Whom are you trying to reach? What are you trying to share with them? Understanding your target audience is the key to crafting a brand that will draw in the right kind of people.

Plan It Out

“A goal without a plan is just a wish.” The only way to ensure that your personal brand not only fits your personality but is also targeted to your ideal audience is to plan, plan, plan. After you’ve determined whom you’re trying to reach, figure out what channels you’re going to use to get in front of them. For example, if you’re trying to reach female millennials, Instagram and Pinterest are great places to start.

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» Wedding PR: Communicating Change

WeddingWire Education Expert

Meghan Ely

Meghan Ely is the owner of wedding marketing and wedding pr firm OFD Consulting. As a highly sought-after speaker in the wedding industry, she is the exclusive Wedding PR Education Expert for WeddingWire as well as the national Communications and Marketing Director for WIPA. To learn how OFD Consulting can assist you, as well as more about our new wedding PR kits, please visit us today.

If January is the time to shake things up with your PR and marketing, then February is the time to focus on execution.

	Wedding PR: Communicating ChangeLast month, my friend and fellow WeddingWire Education Expert Kathryn Hamm challenged the bridal bias in the wedding industry and it made me really think about change and how overwhelming it can be for the wedding pro juggling a million tasks at once.

Fresh off of my own re-brand, I can’t help but feel pangs of empathy when discussing the challenge with clients and colleagues eager to make a change in their own business – whether it be their name, brand or a combination of the two.

The good news? If you take it step-by-step and bring in the right team, the return on your efforts can be considerable. Sow how does one get started?

First, do your due diligence. You’ll want to familiarize yourself with all the to do’s that come with making a change, especially if you’ve decided on a new company name. The US Small Business Administration does a great job outlining the steps here.

Next, assemble your team. If making a name change, then you’ll want to connect with legal and financial counsel quickly. The right branding company can help guide you on your overall look – from your logo and marketing materials to your online presence.

In the midst of the above, you’ll also want to really start thinking about the message you’d like to craft and disseminate about your company’s changes. Ask yourself – why are you making this move and what would you like others to know about you as a result?

When communicating the change, you’ll want to think carefully about your target audience and the best channels for reaching them.  In addition to your prospective clients, you’ll need to consider your current and past clients (remember – the latter are still in a position to refer you!), colleagues you work with regularly and the media.

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» Challenging Bridal Brand Bias in 2016

This post was written by WeddingWire Education Expert Kathryn Hamm, Publisher of GayWeddings.com, the leading online resource dedicated to serving same-sex couples since 1999. Kathryn is also co-author of the groundbreaking book, The New Art of Capturing Love: The Essential Guide to Lesbian and Gay Wedding Photography. Follow her on Twitter @madebykathryn.

Having celebrated two major milestones in 2015 – full marriage equality recognition and the acquisition of GayWeddings.com by WeddingWire – I found myself in the position of asking if my work toward LBGT inclusion in the wedding market was complete.

Photo by Rhinehart Photography

Photo by Rhinehart Photography

One might make that argument. It’s easy to say that there have been many advances. We have:

  • Full marriage equality for same-sex couples in all 50 states and at the federal level, thanks to the June 26, 2015 US Supreme Court decision.
  • Representation of some level of training and education embracing LGBT couples at all of the major conferences for wedding professionals.
  • Attained a participation milestone of more than 120,000 wedding professionals in the GayWeddings.com LGBTQ-friendly directory of wedding professionals.
  • Realized an absolutely breathtaking, near-perfect count of 90% of wedding pros stating that they are ready, willing, and able to serve same-sex couples.
  • Enjoyed recognition by all mainstream wedding sites and a majority of vendor websites that prominent inclusive language and images matter.
  • Seen notable shifts in the inclusion of “grooms” in the media. According to Andy Whittaker, Director of Market Insights at WeddingWire, in six of the largest national and urban papers (both online and in print), there has been a general increase of usage of the term “groom” in articles since 2007, and a decline in the ratio of usage of “brides” to “grooms” in articles since 2011.

For as much ground as we’ve gained since 1999 when my straight mom opened the doors to her online boutiques and began our work, however, there remain some important blind spots in the wedding industry. Thus, there is some remaining work around ‘bridal bias’ to be done.

For some, there is a feeling that the LGBT market is one to be avoided due to its smaller size (4-7% of the U.S. population is estimated to identify as LGBT) or a conflict of belief systems. For others, especially where legal marriage equality is only months old, it’s a matter of ongoing education and exposure. There are also those who merely wish to stand on tradition and habit, and, of course, those who face a very real dilemma about updating a company brand identity that is recognized, has a strong URL and SEO presence, and seems to be working for the many brides seeking resources.

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» How to Turn Your Customers into Brand Advocates

Pro to Pro Insights

Brian Lawrence, Sell the BrideThis post was written by Brian Lawrence, one of the industry’s foremost authorities on marketing in the wedding industry. Brian has consulted with many wedding professionals and wholesale suppliers at www.brianlawrence.com. Brian also owns Local Traffic Builder, a nationally-known web design, marketing and social media firm serving the wedding and event industry. He is the author of “The Wedding Expert’s Guide to Sales and Marketing” and “The Invitation Business Report” and has helped thousands of industry professionals with his marketing insights through personal consultation, books, seminars, blogs and articles, and speaking engagements at leading industry conferences.

Brand ambassador referring friendsHow can you leave such a powerfully positive impression on your customers that they’ll later recommend you to someone else?

If you have an answer, then you have the strongest sales force possible: the satisfied customer who wants everyone to know just how satisfied he or she is. So, how do you develop the kind of relationship that will turn your customers into brand advocates? Below I share some of the best ways to develop a stronger relationship with your clients.

Keep your customers on your radar – even when they are no longer your customers. Send them anniversary cards, holiday cards, birthday cards, and most importantly, keep in touch. Keep them on your radar and they will keep you on theirs.

Show your customers you genuinely care by getting to know them. For example, how can you send a former client a birthday card if you don’t actually know her birth date? Getting to know your clients on a personal level makes them feel like they know something about you (you’re friendly, genuine and personable), and that gives them something to share with others about you.

Go beyond the wedding and see them for other aspects of their lives. Engage with your customers about the ups and downs of life. If a customer mentioned that a family member was ill, keep in touch with them and check in. Investing into the personally-important matters of your customers connects you to them holistically, which means it feels natural for them to share your business with others.

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» Wedding PR: Pitching to Podcasts

WeddingWire Education Expert

Meghan Ely

Meghan Ely is the owner of wedding marketing and wedding pr firm OFD Consulting. As a highly sought-after speaker in the wedding industry, she is the exclusive Wedding PR Education Expert for WeddingWire as well as the national Communications and Marketing Director for WIPA. To learn how OFD Consulting can assist you, as well as more about our new wedding PR kits, please visit us today.

I am, admittedly, a podcast junkie. My love for podcasts stems from the need to fill the hours I spend in my car driving between appointments, networking events and speaking engagements. Quickly I became hooked, and more importantly, became excited about the possibilities of this modern media format.

Listening to podcastsIt’s always great to see a client quoted, or a guest blog submission go live. But there’s something about that unmatched glimpse of personality that pops up when you can hear that person speaking on a favorite topic, or interacting with the host.  It’s a proven fact that couples select their wedding professionals in part due to their personality, and podcasts are the perfect vehicle for sharing that side of your brand.

The good news? The formula for pitching to podcasts does not deviate very far from best practices shared in the past.

Research still serves as the foundation for a great pitch. Study the various podcasts within your scope of expertise – look at past topics and commit to listening to a number of episodes to get a general feel and tone.

If you think it may be a fit, begin developing topic ideas. Make sure they are subject areas that you can speak on for a length of time and that you aren’t pitching something they’ve already covered. I like to have 2-3 topics on hand.

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» Creating An Elevator Pitch For Your Business

Creating An Elevator Pitch For Your BusinessWhat you would say about your wedding business if you met a couple in an elevator and found out they’re planning a wedding?

If you don’t have a quick, concise response, this blog post is for you! At colleges and universities across the country, advisors tell students that they need an “elevator pitch”– a short and compelling summary of what they’re majoring in, what they want in a career, and their past experience. The idea is for the job seeker to sell themselves in approximately a minute.

This is a great practice for Pros to pick up as well, because as a wedding vendor, you are constantly job-seeking: each potential client is a potential job and potential income. The elevator pitch can also be pitched anywhere – trade shows, networking events, or meeting someone in the checkout line at the grocery store! So what should your business’ elevator pitch contain? There are three key elements: basic business information, the vision and values of your business, and what sets you apart from other vendors.

Basic business information

Whether you’re actually having a conversation in an elevator or you’re writing a brief description of your business for your website, it’s important to cover the basics. Where is your business located? Which local markets or regions do you serve? What services do you offer? These are all vital pieces of information that couples must know before even considering your business.

Vision and values

This part of your elevator pitch is a bit more difficult than rattling off your basic information. You likely joined the wedding industry because you’re passionate about weddings and your craft, so hone in on why you feel that passion and articulate it! Explain why weddings mean so much to you, and why your product or service is so important to their big day.

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» 4 Components of a Great Social Media Post

Social media postsWe’ve written about the importance of social media for wedding businesses, detailed upcoming changes to the popular social networks, and explained how to effectively use social media, but there’s still a ton of social media strategy and tactics to cover!

In addition to posting at the right times with the right frequency, there are a few key components you should include in your posts to help your posts get noticed. Below we list the top four components of a great social media post:

Tags and mentions. Networking is important in the wedding industry, and it’s just as important online. Tagging, mentioning, or sharing posts from fellow Pros opens up the channels of communication between you and your peers, but also between you and prospective clients. A “ripple effect” is caused when you mention or share a post from another Pro – you’re now reaching their audience in addition to your own. Tagging and mentioning other professionals in the industry often leads to a friendly relationship with that business, which can lead to more online exposure for both parties.

Examples of your work. The best way to generate leads through  social media is by providing your followers with plenty of examples. Sharing a photo or two of your most recent or favorite wedding gives couples a glimpse into your work and helps them get to know you better. Sharing experiences and work from real weddings also gives prospective clients an idea of your style, so they can determine if it matches their wants and needs. WeddingWire also has a real weddings website where couples and wedding professionals alike can submit weddings to be published on the site.

Professional voice. If you wonder what “voice” means in terms of social media, you’re not alone! Just as it is in blogging, your voice on social media is the tone and feel of the posts. This voice should be consistent across all your social networks, and it should reflect your business’ professionalism. Posting in text/email speak isn’t a good idea, and it’s best to find other ways to shorten your posts without abbreviating words or phrases. We get it – staying under 140 characters can be hard, but abbreviations often come across as juvenile and unprofessional. For example, “Brides love our hairstylists and you’ll love the way you look on your wedding day!” looks much better than “Brides luv our hairstylists & you’ll love the way you look on ur wedding day!”

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» Wedding PR: Tips for Public Speakers

WeddingWire Education Expert

Meghan Ely

Meghan Ely is the owner of wedding marketing and wedding pr firm OFD Consulting. As a highly sought-after speaker in the wedding industry, she is the exclusive Wedding PR Education Expert for WeddingWire as well as the national Communications and Marketing Director for WIPA. To learn how OFD Consulting can assist you, as well as more about our new wedding PR kits, please visit us today.

As I shared last fall, there are a number of steps you’ll need to consider taking if you’d like to begin diving into the world of public speaking. But what about those who have a few speaking engagements under their belt already? Or for those who have been speaking at the local level and would now like to be considered for national conferences?

Wedding PR: Tips for Public SpeakersWhile a clear understanding of your goals and prioritizing time to practice (and practice and practice!) will continue to be essential to the process, consider these tips and tricks to take your public speaking to the next level:

  1. Allow your topics to evolve – When you begin speaking more regularly, a funny thing happens: the topics that you thought would be most popular may actually be your least requested, and suddenly people are clamoring to book you for subjects you may not have considered. Because of this, it’s important to keep track of the needs of your prospects and evolve along with them. I also typically add 4-6 new topics to my portfolio every year to ensure I can offer fresh and inspiring content to event professionals.
  2. Organize your calendar – Make note of any major conferences where you’d like to pitch and familiarize yourself with their submission guidelines, as well as their deadlines. With the latter, note the deadline on your calendar as well as set a date several weeks prior so you can begin preparing.
  3. Ask for testimonials – Reviews are essential to your wedding business and the same can be said for your speaking career. Testimonials equal credibility, plain and simple, so after a speaking engagement, reach out as appropriate and request a review so that you can share it with future prospects.
  4. Request feedback – Never hesitate to ask for constructive feedback from both attendees and those that book you. Additionally, if you aren’t selected for a particular seminar or conference, it doesn’t hurt to reach out and inquire as to why you weren’t selected. The feedback could be invaluable.
  5. Be a thought leader – Speakers leverage their expertise even when they are not on the stage so take advantage of chances to share your knowledge with a wider audience. Many choose to utilize their blog as a channel while others set aside time to research guest writing opportunities as their schedule allows. Your visibility, as well as your reputation in the field, is crucial when being considered a thought leader in your industry.

Public speaking is a proven strategy for wedding professionals who would like to build an additional revenue stream while also increasing brand awareness for their company. With the above tips in mind and a commitment to better their craft, those just starting out in the field will continue to expect healthy return for their efforts.

» Building a Team that Represents Your Brand

This post is by Jennifer Reitmeyer. Jennifer has worked in the wedding industry since 1997. In addition to owning MyDeejay, an award-winning wedding entertainment firm serving the Washington, D.C. market, she also maintains a wedding business blog, WeddingIQ, and a blogging and social media service for wedding businesses, Firebrand Messaging. Jennifer is available for small business coaching, speaking, and writing opportunities. Read more at jenniferreitmeyer.com.

Any business owner knows that hiring the right people is incredibly important to their success. Less clear, however, is exactly how to do it. How can we find good people, train them effectively, and motivate them to represent the brand we’ve worked so hard to create? Here are five steps to building the best team for your business:

Building a Team that Represents Your BrandKnow your brand, inside and out. You certainly can’t expect anyone else to understand your brand if you don’t understand it yourself. And if you don’t understand it, you definitely can’t articulate it to your team! Your brand encompasses what your company does (its service or product), who it serves (your target clientele including demographics, style, budget, buying habits, priorities, and values), how your marketing looks, why you’re different from your competition, and how people perceive your company when they hear its name. Make sure you’re crystal clear on all of these things, so that you can define your brand to the team you’re hiring.

Look for people who are not only good, but good for you. In most wedding-related fields, character traits are as important, if not more important, than education and job skills. You can usually train people on how to do something, but you can’t train them to have the personality, values and qualities that will make them the right fit for your business. I recommend that every business owner identify 3-5 key traits as a starting point for narrowing down new hires – for example, in my DJ business, I chose nice, polished and resourceful. I need genuinely good people, whose appearance and demeanor reflect well on the professionalism of my company’s brand, and who are capable of thinking on their feet and solving problems creatively. My team and I can teach them how to DJ and how to work a wedding, but if they don’t have those three essential qualities, it’s never going to work.

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» Wedding PR: Embracing Brand Journalism

WeddingWire Education Expert

Meghan Ely

Meghan Ely is the owner of wedding marketing and wedding pr firm OFD Consulting. As a highly sought-after speaker in the wedding industry, she is the exclusive Wedding PR Education Expert for WeddingWire as well as the national Communications and Marketing Director for WIPA. To learn how OFD Consulting can assist you, as well as more about our new wedding PR kits, please visit us today.

If you’re a millennial, or anywhere in the vicinity of being a millennial, then you’ve spent the majority of life being sold to. And because of this, companies are having a more difficult time reaching their audience through traditional PR methods.

While press releases, media pitches and ads in general still have their place, companies are eager to find additional methods for getting their message out and engaging with prospective clients.

Wedding PR: Embracing Brand JournalismEnter brand journalism, a discipline that marries storytelling with promotion.

The fact is, stories connect us in an authentic way to our readers. The transparency involved invokes trust. And trust builds loyalty.

Brand journalism is relatively new to the public relations world and is now making its way into the wedding industry. It’s a perfect fit if you think about it – nearly every weekend you have a new story to share about a happy couple in love.

So how does it work exactly?

First, you need to dig into the story of your brand as well as develop the message you want to get across to your defined audience. You’ll also need to ask yourself what type of content will resonate with your target market. Just like qualifying company news to determine if it’s newsworthy, you need to put yourself in the role of the journalist and ask yourself if your prospective readers will actually look forward to reading what you have to say.

For some, that may mean in-depth profiles of each event, or perhaps behind-the-scenes peeks into planning.  If you pride yourself on your relationships with your clients, then perhaps they’re willing to share their story about how they came to work with you, and how you made a difference in their day. If you’re focused on building a personal brand, then be ready to share actual glimpses into your life – from the design of your office to the shoes you put on your feet in the morning.

Very simply put – if you’re having a conversation with your audience, what would that look like?

From there, it’s time to develop actual content. If you’re a strong writer, then it’s time to get to work. If it’s not your particular strength, then consider bringing in a writer to help craft your message. Regardless of what you do, make sure you do so from a place of authenticity. The moment you lose sight of this is the moment you lose your reader.

For many companies, their channel is their own web site and if you already have a blog in place, it can certainly be your platform to start. Like any good promotional strategy, you’ll need to continue to monitor it and evolve with the changing needs of your audience.

Ira Glass once said, “Great stories happen to those who can tell them.” So the question remains – what story are you ready to tell about your brand?

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» Updating Your Brand Presence for Wedding Season

Updating Your Brand Presence for Wedding SeasonAs we move into the spring season, Pros across the country are preparing for a busy wedding season full of events. While you may have already booked most of your weddings through the fall, couples are still seeing your business as they continue to search for their wedding professionals. It’s essential that your brand presence remain strong while you’re otherwise occupied!

Below we break out the individual areas that affect your brand presence online, with tips for updating each area in preparation for the wedding season.

Brand: Add professional photos

It’s important to take time several throughout the year to update your Storefront with recent photos and information. Before you reach for that cell phone camera, though, consider getting some more high-quality images! Featuring high-resolution, professional photos that showcase your business is an important way to make your Storefront and website more appealing to visitors. We recently redesigned the look and feel of your Storefront to bring more attention to photos of your work, and we’ve seen that visitors who click the new Storefront photo carousel view an average of 22 photos per session. The more visitors to your Storefront who check out your photos, the more time they’re spending on your Storefront considering your business. Make the decision easy by giving them plenty of great photos to choose from!

Public Relations: Submit a real wedding

One of the most crucial aspects of developing strong wedding PR for your business is getting published. Whether you’re a DJ, florist, venue, caterer, wedding planner or any other wedding professional, getting published will expose your business to an even wider audience. If you’re taking our advice and adding more professional photos, your Storefront will look more attractive to our Editorial Team, who spend a lot of time browsing WeddingWire Storefronts to look for Wedding Pros to interview and feature. We also created RealWeds.com to streamline the process of submitting real wedding photos to WeddingWire and our sister site, Project Wedding. Whether you submit your own photos or your business is selected by our Editorial Team, being published on WeddingWire will help your business reach even more engaged couples.

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