» How to Be a Social Media Rockstar During Wedding Season

The warmer months mean peak wedding season, which means spending less time at your desk and more time preparing for upcoming weddings. During this busy time, it’s easy to forget about posting to your social media accounts or responding to that message you got on your Facebook page.

However, wedding season gives you the opportunity to stand out among competitors who completely neglect their social media during this time, as well as impress couples who are planning their weddings for winter or next year’s peak season. Here’s how to keep up with your marketing and be a social media rock star throughout wedding season:

 

Narrow your focus

You don’t need to be on every social media platform to be effective. All you need is three: Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest. That’s right – I give you permission to ditch Twitter and LinkedIn (at least for the time being!) and focus all your efforts on only three platforms.

Why these platforms? Our research shows that Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest are the top three social media sites visited by engaged couples. Furthermore, 89% of couples say that they visit Facebook pages of vendors that they are considering for their wedding and 96% use photo sharing sites like Pinterest and Instagram for wedding inspiration.

 

Post often & consistently

Social media algorithms favor accounts that post often and consistently. This means that if you take a week off from posting, the next photo you publish is going to be seen by far fewer people, and you’ll get much less engagement than normal.

How often should you post to be effective? You should be posting on Facebook at least 3-4 times per week, but 5-7 times per week will help you reach the most people. Post at least once per day on Instagram, and pin at least 15 times per day on Pinterest. I know this sounds overwhelming, but scheduling tools can make it super easy to manage and keep up.

 

Plan and schedule content in advance

Imagine glancing at your phone near the end of your day to find dozens of ‘likes’ and comments from brides on a photo posted to your Instagram that day. The best part? You don’t need to touch the Instagram app once for this to happen!

How is this possible? Social media tools like Buffer and Hootsuite (both totally free!) allow you to schedule content for your social media accounts in advance, this way you won’t have to worry about remembering to share something or forgetting to post for weeks. Tools like BoardBooster or Tailwind allow you to pin tons of content on autopilot, so you never even have to look at your account the entire wedding season.

Here’s how to get started: Sign up for an account with Buffer or Hootsuite and link your Facebook and Instagram business accounts. Set aside one hour per week to sit down and schedule your next week of content for both accounts. Pro tip: Don’t schedule the same content for both platforms. Mix up the photos and articles you share so that potential customers have a reason to follow you in both places!

Next, sign up for a BoardBooster or Tailwind account and link your business’s Pinterest. Set your account to automatically pin relevant content to each of your boards daily. If you use BoardBooster, you can also set your boards to ‘loop’ pins. This means that BoardBooster will recycle old pins, pushing them to the top of your boards. Once you set this up, your Pinterest following and engagement will start to grow without even lifting a finger for the rest of wedding season!

» A Roadmap to Inclusive Language For Wedding Show Producers

 

 

This post was written by WeddingWire Education Expert Kathryn Hamm, Publisher of GayWeddings, the leading online resource dedicated to serving same-sex couples since 1999. Kathryn is also co-author of the groundbreaking book, The New Art of Capturing Love: The Essential Guide to Lesbian and Gay Wedding Photography. Follow her on Twitter @madebykathryn.

A year and a half ago, I spoke with a number of wedding professionals, including Meghan Ely of OFD Consulting and Marc McIntosh of the Wedding Experience, about the importance of challenging bridal bias in 2016. That is, the importance of taking an in-depth look at one’s marketing language and, as needed, looking for ways to update and reinvent one’s marketing language to be more inclusive of both brides and grooms. For some (and you know who you are), this might also include completely rebuilding your brand or business name to be more relevant in today’s marketplace.

It’s a little campaign I like to call #BridalRebrand.

After more than a year’s worth of conversations with Marc about this topic, I reached out to him for an update on the work he’s done to challenge bridal bias, refresh his brand, and continue to evolve his product. As you’ll see in our conversation below, he has taken the concept of undertaking a #BridalRebrand to a whole new level.

As you consider this update in the Wedding Experience rebranding journey (the backstory of which you can read here), I hope you’ll also consider the scale and impact with which his work impacts our industry — couples and professionals alike.

Further, I hope you’ll take note: if you are a wedding professional who markets your services through expos like the Wedding Experience, it’s incredibly important for you to recognize how any bridal bias you have in your marketing language might be interpreted and potentially draw the wrong kind of attention to your brand.

Remember: unless your services are intended exclusively for women (eg, wedding gowns), wedding marketing needs to be about “brides and grooms” and/or “engaged couples.” Undertaking a #BridalRebrand may feel daunting but it’s doable. Case in point: the evolution of the Wedding Experience.

KATHRYN: Beyond updating your general language to be more inclusive (for example, using  “engaged couples” and “brides and grooms” instead of “brides”), what other changes did you make in your marketing materials?

MARC: In the past, when we relied primarily on mass-appeal advertising, our message tended to focus on the white female that made up the majority of our audience. Today, there are advertising opportunities that can be narrowly targeted, including social media, online music services and retargeting ads. We can now run ads that reach, for example, only Hispanic engaged couples within a 25 mile radius of our event. This has allowed us to target specific audience segments with a message that speaks directly to them.

While our events have always been designed to be open and inviting to everyone, we didn’t do a great job of communicating that in our advertising. Through targeting, we are now able to appeal to attendees regardless of their ethnicity, age, or sexual orientation. We have advertising that includes images of same-sex couples, and we were the first major wedding show producer to do so.  We have also integrated images that include multi-cultural couples, and we now include models of various shapes and sizes in our fashion shows.

 

“I see our changes as more evolutionary than revolutionary.”

– Marc McIntosh, The Wedding Experience

 

K: Did you run into any roadblocks or special challenges in implementing inclusive language in your print materials vs. your digital materials?

M: We have two audiences, the couples who attend our shows and the wedding professionals who exhibit. Our changes on the attendance side were relatively easy and involved tweaks to our advertising, registration forms and show branding. The changes on the wedding professional side proved to be a bit more challenging. Our exhibitor marketing materials screamed ‘bride’ (‘hundreds of brides attend’, ‘sell to a huge audience of brides’, etc.). The word ‘bride’ was so easy to use (and overuse), and we found that simply replacing it with ‘engaged couple’, or something similar, was a bit awkward at times. Making this change required a major rewrite of our marketing materials, but I am happy with the end result.

K: As you look back, what was the single most difficult hurdle to navigate during your #BridalRebrand overhaul?

M: The biggest hurdle was deciding how we were going to change our advertising to appeal to same-sex couples. Although same-sex marriage is legal, unfortunately, it is still a controversial subject and not yet universally accepted. This is a particular concern in the more conservative markets in which we produce our events. We realized that our changes might offend some prospective attendees and exhibitors, so the challenge was to find the right balance. Once we decided to make the changes, we proceeded without hesitation.  

 

“The best piece of advice that I can offer…is that being more inclusive in your marketing message can result in increased business.”

– Marc McIntosh, The Wedding Experience

 

K: What was easier to implement than you expected?

M: I see our changes as more evolutionary than revolutionary.  We have always strived to be fresh and relevant, and our ‘Bridal Rebrand’ was a continuation of that process. Many of our changes were very easy, such as changing the wording on the buttons we give out at our shows. These now read ‘I’m Getting Married’ instead of ‘Bride To Be’.

K: What sort of feedback have you gotten from the wedding professionals and engaged couples with whom you work?

M: We haven’t received a lot of feedback, either positive or negative, and that is exactly what we wanted. Our attendee audience turns over every year, as people enter the market when they are engaged and leave when they are married. The result is that most are seeing our advertising for the first time and don’t notice that we’ve made changes.

That said, we have seen a substantial increase in the number of couples attending our shows, whereas in the past our attendance was overwhelmingly female.  We have seen a small increase in same-sex couples, but not as many as we would like to see, so we continue to tweak our advertising to that market segment.

K: Anything else you’d like to add or additional advice you’d offer to your colleagues in the industry?

The best piece of advice that I can offer, which was my largest takeaway from all of the work we have done together, is that being more inclusive in your marketing message can result in increased business.  The millennial audience, regardless of their demographic, like and appreciate businesses that are inclusive.

Editor’s Note: if you are looking for a market research resource, check out WeddingWire’s WedInsights.

» 4 Ways to Use Your WeddingWire Reviews on Social Media

Reviews are the best way to earn a couple’s trust and get them excited to book you for their wedding. Couples searching for vendors can easily see your WeddingWire reviews, but you can also showcase your reviews on social media to help attract couples who follow you or stumble on your profile.

Paragraphs of text generally do not perform as well as photos, videos, or slideshows on most social media platforms. This means, you will need to get creative with how you share your reviews in order to reach a larger audience and get the most engagement possible.

Here are four ways to use your WeddingWire reviews on social media:

Create a Graphic Featuring Your Review

Use a program like Canva or Photoshop to create an image displaying your review. Start by copying and pasting a review and the couple’s names in a text box. Customize the font style and color to make the text eye-catching. Then, add elements such as stars, your logo, flowers, and/or borders surrounding the paragraph of text to make the graphic visually appealing and reflective of your brand.

Use the Instagram Carousel Feature

Instagram allows you to post up to 10 photos at a time, giving users the ability to swipe through a series of pictures in a single post. Take advantage of this feature by showcasing a photo along with your work. Here’s how to do this:

  1. Pick a review that a couple submitted on WeddingWire about you. Make a graphic featuring this review.
  2. Start a new post in the Instagram app.
  3. Click on the “Select Multiple” button.
  4. Select a photo featuring your work from this specific couple’s wedding.
  5. Select the graphic you made showcasing the review from the couple.
  6. In your caption, tell your audience to swipe right to see what the couple had to say about your work!

You could also switch the photos around so that way the review comes first and the wedding photos come second in the carousel. Either way, this type of post is powerful because it shows potential clients your work, along with what past couples thought of it at the same time!

Use the Carousel Feature on Facebook to Share Your WeddingWire Profile

Facebook also has a Carousel feature that allows you to upload up to five photos that users can scroll through, each of which includes a headline underneath it. You can use the carousel to showcase photos of your work and send people to your WeddingWire profile.

Here’s how to do this:

  1. Go to your business page and click to share a photo.
  2. Select “Create a Photo Carousel.”
  3. Write a caption that features a review and encourages couples to click to see more testimonials.
  4. Enter the URL for your WeddingWire profile as the destination URL and click the blue arrow.
  5. Upload up to five photos of your work.
  6. Click on the text below each image and paste short quotes (3-5 words) pulled from your reviews under each image.
  7. Publish your post!

This type of post is unique and engaging, so it is excellent for getting couples to click and read your reviews.

Showcase Your Reviews on Your Website

Include your WeddingWire reviews on your services pages, contact page, and sales pages on your website. At the end of the review, link to your WeddingWire profile and encourage couples to click through to see more reviews. This way, when a couple is perusing your website, they will see multiple reviews about your work, as well as the option to click and read more.

» How Should You Politely Tell A Client ‘I Don’t Do That’?

It’s a near universal fact of life as a creative professional that sometimes your taste and unique skills just don’t line up with the trend of the moment. So, first off, you’re not alone. Trends can be set pretty arbitrarily sometimes—a celebrity is seen in some wildly off-kilter style and suddenly everyone in their sphere of influence wants that look. Other times, pure necessity or genuine concern or simply aesthetics dictate a trend. Whatever the reason, there might be times when the wedding trend of the moment isn’t something you feel comfortable doing. Maybe you’re a baker who doesn’t believe that naked cakes are a good representation of your skills. Or, perhaps, you’re a florist who just hasn’t mastered floral crowns, and therefore doesn’t feel comfortable offering them as a product just yet.

All of this brings us to the potential client request. How should you politely tell a potential client, “Thanks, but that trend really isn’t up my alley”? Here are some suggestions.

Be Very Gracious. We’re sure you are always thankful for inquiries, but it never hurts to have a reminder that every inquiry from a potential client means you’re one of a few in the running for that couple’s business. For that reason, start any response with appreciation for their time and a sincere thank you. Regardless of whether you end up becoming a part of their wedding team, you’re learning something about new people and expanding your network, so yay!

Don’t Insult Their Taste. Aesthetics and personal taste are in the eyes of the beholder, so just because you personally don’t stock lucite chairs, that doesn’t mean that the correct way to address a potential client is a diatribe about how tacky you think they are. Same goes for skimpy wedding gowns, multi-colored wedding hair or any other client request that might run afoul of your personal taste.

Be Transparent. Of course, you want to salvage the sale, even if the client is gung-ho about 12 flower crowns for the wedding party, or if the couple insists on a naked cake that you don’t like doing. But, it’s a great business practice to be honest and transparent with your potential clients. For that reason, in the most polite way possible, just tell the truth. However, don’t stop at, “I apologize, but naked cakes aren’t a part of my offerings.” Don’t be afraid to have a quick explanation for the why. This way, potential clients see this is a thoughtful decision on your part, and not just an excuse for not doing something you don’t like to do.

Offer an Alternative. Now comes the time when you want to rescue the sale. It’s important to stay abreast of wedding trends so if this moment comes, you have enough knowledge of other, similar trends to offer up as an alternative. For example, while naked cakes enjoyed a moment in the sun, “nearly naked” cakes are a happy medium for some that are created in the spirit of the trend while not being such an exact interpretation. As huge trends take off in your service category, if you feel that they’re not something you’re comfortable creating, try to think of your version or an alternative that might satisfy some clients.

» 5 Questions Couples Should Ask Wedding Pros (But Don’t)

As the wedding professional, each time you meet with a new couple, you’re the expert. Chances are, they haven’t hosted a wedding before, and their level of expertise with pulling off an event of this size extends only to being a member of someone else’s wedding party. With this in mind, your potential clients’ questions will likely be most focused on the aesthetics of bringing their wedding vision to life, which is great! However, it’s your job as the expert to be sure your couples are well-informed about some of the oft-forgotten aspects of hiring you.

Here are a few questions you’ll want to be sure to answer, even if your client doesn’t know or doesn’t remember to ask.

Can you describe your style?/Can I see some of your work? This one is a bit tricky, as most likely your potential client has seen photos of your weddings on WeddingWire and may have even popped over to your Instagram profile to check out more of your aesthetic. Even with that being the case, you want to take the opportunity to describe and show your style, why you approach your work the way you do and how you help couples visions come to life. This is also an opportunity for you to tailor your portfolio to your couple. For example, if you know they’re planning a rustic wedding, pull out some examples of rustic weddings you’ve done in the past. If you know they’re going for a modern, trendy wedding look, show that you’ve created those kinds of weddings as well.

Do you have a list of preferred vendors? Unless you’re a wedding venue, chances are you don’t have hard-and-fast lists of wedding professionals with which you strongly prefer to work. Still, if you’re a photographer who has done a dozen weddings with a great videographer, it’s worth mentioning. If you’re a wedding planner who has a couple of florists who seamlessly pull your vision to life, let your potential client know. One of the most difficult aspects of wedding planning can be sourcing a team of wedding professionals, so helping your clients by recommending great pros who work well with each other is worthwhile. You’ll need to bring this up, as your potential client may not be aware that wedding pros frequently work together.

What other fees am I expected to cover? Most likely, your potential client is looking at the “base” price to determine how your services will fit into their wedding budget, but there might be other, smaller fees that they should be aware of. These are highly dependent on the service category, but could include overtime fees, setup and/or delivery fees, breakdown fees and any number of practical costs for your additional services, time or equipment. Once your client has chosen which service they’d like, be sure to mention fees that you know they’ll incur, as well as any optional fees that might come into effect (like overtime).

Can I review this contract with my parents, future-in-laws or anyone else who is paying for it? Sometimes, the entire family will come for a venue tour or a cake tasting. Other times, only the couple or maybe even only one member of the couple will meet you for the initial visit. However, most weddings involve a whole team of people who are making decisions and fronting the costs. For this reason, it’s important to try to suss out who the important stakeholders might be for each client and try to be on the up-and-up with those people as well. So, if you know your couple’s flowers are being paid for by a groom’s mother, be sure she’s involved before the contract is signed. Not only will this likely make the wedding planning process easier for your clients, but you’ll be working toward a more satisfied client once the service is complete.

Who will be my 24/7 contact person? If you’re a one-person business, this is an easy thing to mention to your new clients. If you’re a larger business with a separate team to handle sales and events, this is trickier. No matter the structure of your business, you want to be sure your client knows who will be their point person throughout the planning along with who will be the point person for other wedding pros they will hire in the future. As the wedding approaches, you may want to offer a few different ways to get in touch — maybe a text or email after hours — so that as things pop up, your client feels comfortable letting you know about them.

» 4 Simple Ways to Outsmart Pinterest’s Smart Feed

Most couples (about 96%, actually) use photo sharing sites like Pinterest in the ‘dreaming’ phase of wedding planning. That means all those couples are using Pinterest for wedding inspiration, ideas, and planning. However, Pinterest is not a social networking site. It is a search engine. Pinterest users do not use the platform to interact with peers. They use the platform as a tool to plan purchases, find inspiration, and view tutorials.

Since Pinterest is a search engine, they have an algorithm called the Smart Feed, which determines what pins show up in a user’s feed at any given time. In order to succeed with Pinterest, you will have to show the Smart Feed that your account shares quality content that Pinterest users will love. Here’s how to do it:

Makeover your profile 

Start by sprucing up your profile. You want couples to land on your profile, fall in love with it, and take action by following you or clicking on your website. Here are a few key elements to update:

  • Ditch your logo, and use a headshot or staff photo as your profile picture. Pinterest users are more interested in content from people, not companies, so this will appeal to them more.
  • Make sure you include keywords like your service category, your location and your style in your display name, bio, board descriptions, and pin descriptions. This will help you get found in search results.
  • Delete old pins that have few repins and/or favorites. You may love your content, but the Smart Feed will lower your ‘quality score’ if they see lots of pins that no one is taking action on. Removing them will help future pins get seen.

 

Use board covers to make your profile stand out 

Board covers are used to visually label each of your boards. It helps your profile appearance match your branding, and makes you stand out when couples click to see your profile. Make 800×800 pixel board covers (you can use a site like Canva if you aren’t Photoshop proficient), then upload each cover to the corresponding board. Click to edit each board and select your uploaded image to set it as the board cover.

Pinterest Board Covers Example

 

Pin 15+ times per day

This may sound super overwhelming, but the Smart Feed favors users who pin frequently and consistently. Once you start pinning at least 15 times per day, you will start to see growth in followers, repins, and favorites. Plus, the more your pins are seen, the more clicks to your website you will get! Use an application like BoardBooster to automate all of your curated pins, then manually add 5-10 original pins per week, each with a link to your website.

 

Optimize your pins

When you post your own original content, follow these guidelines:

  • Always post vertical photos, not horizontal. In fact, the taller your photo is, the better. 735×1102 pixels is the recommended photo size, but my pins sized at 735x1305p pixels perform best.
  • Use bright, high-quality images. Do not post them if they are grainy or blurry.
  • Include a keyword rich description for every pin. Never pin without a description.
  • Pin each photo to one board, then repin each to all other boards with topics that it relates to in order to increase your quality ranking in the Smart Feed.

Take all of these steps to start sending Pinterest couples to your website and dramatically increase your Pinterest statistics. It will take some time for Pinterest to start showing your pins in couples’ feeds more, but it will be worth it in the long run. Happy pinning!

» Get Ready to Rock with the WeddingWire Music & Entertainment Guide!

Anyone who’s ever attended a wedding knows that the right music can make or break the experience. That’s why the WeddingWire Editorial Team created the brand-new WeddingWire Music & Entertainment Guide. It’s full of useful information to help couples choose both the right songs and the right professionals for their ceremony, cocktail hour, and reception—definitely worth sharing with your clients. Some of the topics covered in this guide include:

  • How to choose between live music or a DJ
  • Top songs for the important moments
  • How to best work with your music professionals
  • Other forms of entertainment for your wedding day

Be sure to check out the WeddingWire Music & Entertainment Guide, and stay tuned for more guides throughout the year.

Cover photo by Afterglow Images

» 4 Easy Steps to Content Creation as a Wedding Pro

When it comes to marketing and PR for your company, content creation is king – especially if you’re the one creating it. It’s no secret that Google loves fresh, well-written and continually updated new content on a blog, rewarding it with higher rankings and greater chance for attention.

If establishing yourself as an expert is part of your master business plan, one of the expectations is that you will provide new, enriching content regularly via your own blog and through partnerships with other media outlets. So how do you create exciting and valuable new content as a wedding pro?

Outline your goals. Ask yourself, “What do I hope to accomplish by focusing more of my time on content creation?” You want to make sure you have a purpose and it’s clear what sort of Return on Investment (ROI) will qualify your content strategy as a success.

content creation

 

Begin creating a content calendar. Determine where you’re posting – which social media, blogs, and guest writing opportunities – as well as how often, keeping in mind that your goals should be manageable.

Figure out what you’ll write about. How, you ask? Host a brainstorming session with your team. Take notes after wedding days on scenarios you can turn into a list of tips for couples. Carve out a brief amount of time weekly to review mainstream press, like your local daily newspaper or The New York Times. Then ask yourself how it can relate to the event industry. Cover company news and industry news. Provide valuable content to your audience with the intention of getting closer to your goals.

Track your progress and revisit statistics quarterly. Ensure that your content remains aligned with your goals. Review your responsibilities and commitments and ask yourself if it’s still feasible to create as much content as you’re doing. Use your analytics to see what posts (social media, blog, others) end up with the most engagements and click-throughs to your site. The best plan is one that evolves and addresses what your audience wants and needs.

Content creation requires commitment and analysis. Done well, it can yield new business opportunities, increased attention to your work, and advancement in the industry of your recognition as an expert. Make a plan, review your goals and achievements, and don’t be afraid to take the leap – start building your content portfolio today.

 

Exclusive Wedding PR Education Expert for WeddingWire Meghan Ely is the owner of wedding PR agency OFD Consulting. She also leads the newly launched OFD Collective, a membership based community of wedding professionals seeking PR education and publicity opportunities for their business.

» WeddingWire Networking Night Southern New Jersey

This week, local wedding professionals gathered at The Carriage House for WeddingWire Networking Night Southern New Jersey!

At the Networking Night, wedding professionals had the opportunity to enjoy an gorgeous venue space, network with other local vendors across all service categories, and meet members of the WeddingWire team. Plus, they learned about local-industry statistics and how to better reach engaged couples through social media from WeddingWire’s Regional Manager of Customer Success, Katey McBurney.

Thank you to all the wonderful professionals who joined us! We’re excited to share highlights from the event including the educational presentation, our latest issue of WedInsights, and photos from the evening below.

We would like to say a special thank you to the amazing event partners who helped make the evening possible:

Finally, we’re excited to announce the winner of our WeddingWire Prize Pack give away – congrats to Anna from Ramblewood Country Club!

» How to Set Your Prices Based on Your Value

I was just at the Photo Booth Expo, and as you can imagine, there were many, many different types of equipment there. Features varied, as did prices. I was speaking with a couple that owns seven photo booths, and they were considering a new mirror booth. There were a couple of different ones they were considering, but one was a lot more expensive than the other. While the quality of the more expensive one was evident, they were torn on which one to buy.

 

Customers buy value, not price. 

My advice? No matter which one they decide to buy, they should charge the same price to rent it out. My statement confused them, as the more expensive booth was more than double the price to buy. Customers aren’t going to have them side-by-side. They’re not going to know what you didn’t buy. They’re only going to know what you bring to their wedding or event. And, most importantly, they’re not paying you for the equipment. They’re paying you for the outcome, which is the fun their guests are going to have at their wedding or event.

This is true for every product and service. While you need to know your costs, you charge for the outcome. Photographers and videographers have many choices of equipment. Most couples wouldn’t be able to tell the difference between photos shot with a Canon camera versus a Nikon. DJs and bands have many choices of equipment. Most customers couldn’t tell the difference between JBL speakers and Bose. Caterers have infinite choices of kitchen equipment, yet the customer gives no thought to how the food is cooked, just that it wows their guests.

 

How do you set your prices?

When you’re deciding how much to charge for your products and services, how do you go about it? Do you take your costs and charge a multiple (3X cost, 5X cost)? Do you even know your costs? Have you taken into consideration your overhead (rent, utilities, insurance, etc.)? Whether it’s envelopes, toilet paper or paper clips, the money to pay for that has to come from your gross sales.

 

If you don’t value your time, no one will.

Too many wedding pros undervalue their time—do you? Do you know how much time it takes to perform your services? Have you included the time it takes to answer emails, take phone calls, and meet in-person (or virtually)? I was sitting with a DJ who was lamenting to me about another inquiry that asked for his “5-hour package.” We started talking about how much time he actually spends on each wedding, from the initial inquiry through any appointments, planning meetings/calls, editing music for each introduction and their first dance, planning their playlist (and do-not-play list) – then the packing up and travel time to their wedding, the wedding itself and then packing up, the time getting home and unpacking. He figured that it was between 35 and 40 hours.

How much is your 5-hour package?

So, I suggested that the next time someone asks about his 5-hour package, he reply, something like this: “Thanks so much for giving me the opportunity to show you how much fun I can make your wedding. I’d love to pack your dance floor, and have your guests saying it was the best wedding they’ve ever attended. I don’t have a 5-hour package, but I’d love to tell you about my 35-hour package – the 5 hours you and your guests will see – and the other 30 hours that I’ll be investing, before your wedding, to ensure its success, which you can see from our dozens of fantastic reviews.” 

Are you charging only for the time you spend at their wedding? Or, are you taking into account all of the other time you’re going to invest in them? Too many wedding and event pros set their prices based upon what someone else is charging. How do you know their prices are correct? You don’t. Do you know their costs? No. Do you have the same overhead? No. What if their prices are too low (as they often are)? Don’t chase them to the bottom.

Over the years, I’ve challenged many of you to justify your current prices. Can you raise you prices now? Not sure? Ask yourself this: If your prices were 5% higher, last year, how many of your customers would have said “No”? If the answer is none, or very few, your prices are too low. You’re undervaluing yourself. When you get to the point where some are saying “No,” but there would be others who would say, “Yes,” to the higher price, then you can still raise your prices. When you get to the point where too many would be saying “No,” and others would also say, “No,” then you’ve gone too far.

 

Raising your rates isn’t as difficult as it seems.

Early this year I got an email from a wedding pro: “I put one of your suggestions into action right after the seminar, and increased my servicing fees by $15 per hour, and NOT ONE PERSON objected. Many thanks from my family, because it really was that easy to put an extra $1500 in our family pocket, which means winter holiday in Mexico, NOT Vancouver Island LOL.” Another wedding pro, a DJ, doubled his prices during one of my presentations, and the next day he sold two weddings at the higher prices! He hadn’t raised his prices in years, and had gotten comfortable selling at the lower price, because it was easy. Now, he finds it just as easy to sell at the higher price.

 

How much money are you leaving on the table?

Every dollar you raise your prices is extra profit. Conversely, every dollar you discount your prices is profit you’re giving away. Take a good, hard look at your pricing structure, then ask yourself those questions about how many would say. “No” to higher prices. Next, see how much more profit you can gain. I look forward to hearing your stories of success!

 

alan bergThis article was written by WeddingWire Education Guru Alan Berg, CSP. Alan has over 20
years experience in wedding related sales and marketing, and is an author, business consultant, a member of the National Speakers Association, and the wedding & event industry’s only Certified Speaking Professional®. Learn more at alanberg.com

» WeddingWire Networking Night Philadelphia

This week, local wedding professionals gathered at The Franklin Institute for WeddingWire Networking Night Philadelphia!

At the Networking Night, wedding professionals had the opportunity to enjoy an amazing venue space, network with other local vendors across all service categories, and meet members of the WeddingWire team. Plus, they learned about local-industry statistics and how to better reach engaged couples through social media from WeddingWire’s Regional Manager of Customer Success, Katey McBurney.

Thank you to all the wonderful professionals who joined us! We’re excited to share highlights from the event including the educational presentation, our latest issue of WedInsights, and photos from the evening below.

We would like to say a special thank you to the amazing event partners who helped make the evening possible:

Finally, we’re excited to announce the winner of our WeddingWire Prize Pack give away – congrats to Brian from The Philly Keys!


» How and When to Start Expanding for Business Growth

Business growth means something different to everyone but, in most cases, it’s a step in the right direction. However, it’s important that a company’s growth comes at the right time in order to be successful; otherwise, you may find that your company is growing faster than your schedule and financial resources can afford.

For this reason, it’s important for business owners to map out their growth plan so they have an idea of when and how they will be able to accommodate the added work that comes with a next-level business. The decision to grow is not one to be taken lightly, so come into your development with an open mind and a step-by-step plan.

If you’ve thought hard about it and decided that growing your business is the direction you want to take, you’ll want to be sure to have a team on hand to guide you throughout the transition. Even if you’re a solopreneur, don’t feel like you have to do this alone. Start by finding a business coach who can help you develop your next step (whether it’s bringing on employees or adding a new service), while still maintaining the brand you’ve worked so hard to create. An accountant and/or financial advisor are other great additions to have on the team, as you will see a change in your finances and will need to ensure your solvency.

business growth wedding professionals wedding vendor

Prior to expanding your business in any way, it’s important to be sure your business has policies and procedures in place to ensure things run smoothly and consistently regardless of where you are in your journey. For example, if you plan on bringing on new team members, have an onboarding guide in place to help them through the first few weeks of their employment.

Even if bringing on employees isn’t a part of your plan, chances are it will be a decision down the line if your business continues to grow. One person can only do so much! Once you’ve gathered more clients or are offering more services, it may make sense to hire an assistant to help you with the business administration side of things.

As your company develops, be sure that you are open and honest about changes with your industry peers, as well as your clients. Transparency is the key to building trust among your network, so don’t think about launching a new product or starting a side-hustle without communicating your intentions to your target audiences.

With some careful planning and a lot of honest ambition, you are sure to push your business to the next level in no time! Remember that everyone’s timeline is different, so don’t feel pressured by competitors or other companies in your industry. Growth should be organic, so stick to what feels right.

This post was written by Jennifer Taylor. Jennifer Taylor is the owner of Taylor’d Events Group, a planning firm that specializes in celebrations of all kinds in the Pacific Northwest and Maui. She is also the creator of The Taylor’d Plan, a self-administered class for wedding planners who are new to the industry and looking to grow and develop their skills.