» Wedding PR: Embracing Brand Journalism

WeddingWire Education Expert

Meghan Ely

Meghan Ely is the owner of wedding marketing and wedding pr firm OFD Consulting. As a highly sought-after speaker in the wedding industry, she is the exclusive Wedding PR Education Expert for WeddingWire as well as the national Communications and Marketing Director for WIPA. To learn how OFD Consulting can assist you, as well as more about our new wedding PR kits, please visit us today.

If you’re a millennial, or anywhere in the vicinity of being a millennial, then you’ve spent the majority of life being sold to. And because of this, companies are having a more difficult time reaching their audience through traditional PR methods.

While press releases, media pitches and ads in general still have their place, companies are eager to find additional methods for getting their message out and engaging with prospective clients.

Wedding PR: Embracing Brand JournalismEnter brand journalism, a discipline that marries storytelling with promotion.

The fact is, stories connect us in an authentic way to our readers. The transparency involved invokes trust. And trust builds loyalty.

Brand journalism is relatively new to the public relations world and is now making its way into the wedding industry. It’s a perfect fit if you think about it – nearly every weekend you have a new story to share about a happy couple in love.

So how does it work exactly?

First, you need to dig into the story of your brand as well as develop the message you want to get across to your defined audience. You’ll also need to ask yourself what type of content will resonate with your target market. Just like qualifying company news to determine if it’s newsworthy, you need to put yourself in the role of the journalist and ask yourself if your prospective readers will actually look forward to reading what you have to say.

For some, that may mean in-depth profiles of each event, or perhaps behind-the-scenes peeks into planning.  If you pride yourself on your relationships with your clients, then perhaps they’re willing to share their story about how they came to work with you, and how you made a difference in their day. If you’re focused on building a personal brand, then be ready to share actual glimpses into your life – from the design of your office to the shoes you put on your feet in the morning.

Very simply put – if you’re having a conversation with your audience, what would that look like?

From there, it’s time to develop actual content. If you’re a strong writer, then it’s time to get to work. If it’s not your particular strength, then consider bringing in a writer to help craft your message. Regardless of what you do, make sure you do so from a place of authenticity. The moment you lose sight of this is the moment you lose your reader.

For many companies, their channel is their own web site and if you already have a blog in place, it can certainly be your platform to start. Like any good promotional strategy, you’ll need to continue to monitor it and evolve with the changing needs of your audience.

Ira Glass once said, “Great stories happen to those who can tell them.” So the question remains – what story are you ready to tell about your brand?

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