» The Modern Media Pitch

WeddingWire Education Expert

Meghan Ely

Meghan Ely is the owner of wedding marketing and wedding pr firm OFD Consulting. As a highly sought-after speaker in the wedding industry, she is the exclusive Wedding PR Education Expert for WeddingWire as well as the national Communications and Marketing Director for WIPA. To learn how OFD Consulting can assist you, as well as more about our new wedding PR kits, please visit us today.

Gone are the days when media pitches are strictly limited to blasting out the same press release to your email list of reporters. Many people are missing out on opportunities to get their name out there, simply because they think that a pitch has to be about their company and they may not always have news to share.

Sure, there is plenty of company news that is worth the pitch – anything that is timely, relevant and interesting is generally well received. However, there are plenty of other ways to get press without forcing not-so-newsworthy news into editors’ inboxes.

The Modern Media PitchCreate an effective media list

First and foremost, you’ll need to determine the best media outlets that fit your brand and your niche. Of those outlets, it’s important to find the right contacts and gather their info. This may be a bit of a task upfront, as it could require some good old-fashioned Google searching and social media stalking, but it’s well worth having the right contacts on file. There are also a number of programs to introduce you to new contacts, like HARO, SourceBottle and Babbler. Once you have your list, keep them organized in a spreadsheet that is easily accessible and simple to use.

Developing the pitch

A pitch is simply a story idea, so put your thinking cap on and get creative. In our office, we have a weekly meeting to review what’s in the news regarding weddings to get an idea of what’s buzzing around. From there, we look at each major news story and how we can turn it into a softer story angle and develop pitches out of those ideas. We’re also lucky enough to have a recent bride on our team, so if you have a newlywed, don’t be afraid to dig into their experience! You can also keep an eye out on your own weddings to see if there are any stories brewing that would make for a good pitch.

Sending out the pitch

Once you know who you’re pitching and what you’re pitching, it’s time to write it up. Always address the contact by their first name when possible and be professional throughout the email. Keep it short and simple, while still getting to the point you want to cover – editors are notoriously slammed with deadlines, pitches and other work, so you want to get your message across without taking up too much of their time. Offer yourself as a resource for further questions and thank them for their consideration.

Don’t fret if your pitch isn’t picked up. You’ve made a valuable media connection, which is worth its weight in gold in the PR world. Now, on to your next pitch…