» Introducing Education Expert Jennifer Reitmeyer

This post is by Jennifer Reitmeyer. Jennifer has worked in the wedding industry since 1997. In addition to owning MyDeejay, an award-winning wedding entertainment firm serving the Washington, D.C. market, she also maintains a wedding business blog, WeddingIQ, and a blogging and social media service for wedding businesses, Firebrand Messaging. Jennifer is available for small business coaching, speaking, and writing opportunities. Read more at jenniferreitmeyer.com.

We are pleased to introduce Jennifer Reitmeyer of WeddingIQ, a new WeddingWire Education Expert!

Jennifer will be contributing guest posts and sharing her small business expertise monthly on our blog. Check out Jennifer’s first post, Tempering Expectations and Generosity, below. Welcome, Jennifer!

Jennifer has worked in the wedding industry since 1997. In addition to owning MyDeejay, Inc., an award-winning wedding entertainment firm serving the Washington, D.C. market, she also maintains a wedding business blog, WeddingIQ, and is available for small business coaching, speaking, and writing opportunities.  Read more at http://weddingiq.com.

At some point in every Wedding Pro’s career, there comes a time when a client is less than happy with the product or service that was received. Almost inevitably, that Wedding Pro is crushed – even more so if the client writes a bad review – and the Pro immediately thinks of all the ways that he/she went above and beyond for that client:

But I upgraded their package for free!
But I threw in all these extras!
But I did three more consultations than I normally do!
But I sent them such a nice free gift after the wedding!

This kind of thinking makes sense – after all, many Wedding Pros I know are incredibly generous, thoughtful, and really put their heart and soul into their work. It stings to have someone not appreciate our extra effort.

As logical as it is, however, this thinking is also flawed. The fact is: people don’t value what they receive for free. I think this is true for several reasons:

  • Throwing in “extras” left and right calls into question the true value of a company’s product or service – if you’re trying that hard, there’s probably a reason.
  • Convincing an uncertain buyer to purchase from you by piling on the freebies may get them to sign, but it also may create resentment later if the client decides they feel manipulated or that they spent more than was intended.
  • Including tons of “off-the-books” stuff only increases the client’s expectations of you. After all, if you’re willing to override your standard packages and contracts, why shouldn’t the client think you’ll be willing to do anything else they ask, too?
  • Giving away things that the client didn’t even want doesn’t absolve you from delivering on what they do want (and paid for). Consider this: if you went to a car dealership and received a free navigation system, but the car itself didn’t run well after you drove it off the lot, would you be satisfied?

Rather than throwing in more and more upgrades, you’d be better served by focusing on your product and your customer service processes to identify any possible shortcomings. This will be much better insurance against dissatisfied clients than giving away the store.