» 5 Questions Couples Should Ask Wedding Pros (But Don’t)

As the wedding professional, each time you meet with a new couple, you’re the expert. Chances are, they haven’t hosted a wedding before, and their level of expertise with pulling off an event of this size extends only to being a member of someone else’s wedding party. With this in mind, your potential clients’ questions will likely be most focused on the aesthetics of bringing their wedding vision to life, which is great! However, it’s your job as the expert to be sure your couples are well-informed about some of the oft-forgotten aspects of hiring you.

Here are a few questions you’ll want to be sure to answer, even if your client doesn’t know or doesn’t remember to ask.

Can you describe your style?/Can I see some of your work? This one is a bit tricky, as most likely your potential client has seen photos of your weddings on WeddingWire and may have even popped over to your Instagram profile to check out more of your aesthetic. Even with that being the case, you want to take the opportunity to describe and show your style, why you approach your work the way you do and how you help couples visions come to life. This is also an opportunity for you to tailor your portfolio to your couple. For example, if you know they’re planning a rustic wedding, pull out some examples of rustic weddings you’ve done in the past. If you know they’re going for a modern, trendy wedding look, show that you’ve created those kinds of weddings as well.

Do you have a list of preferred vendors? Unless you’re a wedding venue, chances are you don’t have hard-and-fast lists of wedding professionals with which you strongly prefer to work. Still, if you’re a photographer who has done a dozen weddings with a great videographer, it’s worth mentioning. If you’re a wedding planner who has a couple of florists who seamlessly pull your vision to life, let your potential client know. One of the most difficult aspects of wedding planning can be sourcing a team of wedding professionals, so helping your clients by recommending great pros who work well with each other is worthwhile. You’ll need to bring this up, as your potential client may not be aware that wedding pros frequently work together.

What other fees am I expected to cover? Most likely, your potential client is looking at the “base” price to determine how your services will fit into their wedding budget, but there might be other, smaller fees that they should be aware of. These are highly dependent on the service category, but could include overtime fees, setup and/or delivery fees, breakdown fees and any number of practical costs for your additional services, time or equipment. Once your client has chosen which service they’d like, be sure to mention fees that you know they’ll incur, as well as any optional fees that might come into effect (like overtime).

Can I review this contract with my parents, future-in-laws or anyone else who is paying for it? Sometimes, the entire family will come for a venue tour or a cake tasting. Other times, only the couple or maybe even only one member of the couple will meet you for the initial visit. However, most weddings involve a whole team of people who are making decisions and fronting the costs. For this reason, it’s important to try to suss out who the important stakeholders might be for each client and try to be on the up-and-up with those people as well. So, if you know your couple’s flowers are being paid for by a groom’s mother, be sure she’s involved before the contract is signed. Not only will this likely make the wedding planning process easier for your clients, but you’ll be working toward a more satisfied client once the service is complete.

Who will be my 24/7 contact person? If you’re a one-person business, this is an easy thing to mention to your new clients. If you’re a larger business with a separate team to handle sales and events, this is trickier. No matter the structure of your business, you want to be sure your client knows who will be their point person throughout the planning along with who will be the point person for other wedding pros they will hire in the future. As the wedding approaches, you may want to offer a few different ways to get in touch — maybe a text or email after hours — so that as things pop up, your client feels comfortable letting you know about them.