» Our Favorite Same-Sex Real Weddings for LGBTQ Pride Month

Our celebration of LGBTQ Pride month continues with a roundup of some of our favorite Real Weddings featuring same-sex couples! (If you missed some of our other LGBTQ coverage, check out the LGTBQ Wedding Planning Guide, How to show your pride this month and a 10-year timeline of marriage equality wins for the wedding industry.)

Natasha and Bri had lots of fun at their North Carolina mansion wedding. See more of their wedding.

Photos by Johanna Dye Photography

Michael and Joey’s wedding at the South Carolina Aquarium was full of tradition and love! See more photos here.

Photos by Stephanie W Photography

Valerie and Nicole made gorgeous brides at their Riviera Palm Springs wedding! Check out their Real Wedding.

Photos by Randy + Ashley Studios


Terry and Julia brought the elegance and fun in equal measure at their Bay Area wedding. See more of their wedding photos.

Photos by Kat Ma Photography

Tony and Mike wanted a modern hipster wedding inspired by the Coldplay song “Yellow” — vision achieved! Check out their Real Wedding.

Photos by Rising Lotus Photography


Chealyn and Ashley hosted an elaborate elopement in Asheville, North Carolina on a picturesque mountaintop. See more of their wedding photos.

Photos by Meghan Rolfe Photography

Edgar and Macio were inspired by cherryblossoms, vibrant, pink flowers that symbolize love and friendship. Check out their Real Wedding.

Photos by Clane Gessel Photography

» Wedding PR: How to Shine a Spotlight on Your Business

Meghan Ely is the owner of wedding PR and wedding marketing firm OFD Consulting. Ely is a sought-after speaker, adjunct professor in the field of public relations, and a self-professed royal wedding enthusiast. She recently launched the OFD Collective, a wedding PR membership site that offers continuing education, press opportunities and real wedding submissions.

So, you’re doing amazing work and want people to know about it, right? Whole new audiences deserve to know your brand is ready to take over the world, but you need a way to reach them. Perhaps you want to establish yourself as an industry leader, and well, frankly, increasing your sales wouldn’t hurt either. A strategic and well-implemented public relations (PR) campaign is exactly what you need!

 

What Is Wedding PR?

Smart pros turn to wedding PR when they have a message they want to get out to a target audience and media is the main channel for communicating that message. It is distinct from two other popular forms of promotion: advertising and marketing, both of which have their merits, too. 

The big difference between PR and advertising is that the latter takes place in a controlled setting. Typically, you pay to control the content, placement and space used. With PR, you are at the mercy of the editor, so what you promote must be positioned to grab attention in a noisy world.

Marketing focuses on specific details such as product, prices and packaging. PR, in contrast, is all about the newsworthy story.

 

 

What You Must Consider in Advanceblog PR wedding

  • When pursuing a PR campaign, there are some important advance considerations. You’ll need to ensure that:
  • Your brand is exactly what you want it to be. When your PR campaign sends people to your site, you want them to find the right messaging and are far more likely to convert to sales.
  • You have evaluated your goals and are campaigning for the right reasons.
  • You know how to assess your analytics. Make sure you’re able to track how prospects find you through web analytics and contact forms that ask how they heard about you and your business.

Great PR takes effort and planning, so don’t neglect these considerations. Give them due consideration, check them off your list then follow up by choosing the right outlet for your message.

 

Pitch Wisely

To determine the right fit, you have to make sure that the media you pursue will actually connect you with your target audience, otherwise your efforts may gain you attention, but not the attention you need to achieve your goals.

 

Where to Begin: Real Weddings

A good place to start is with real wedding submissions, considered the low-hanging fruit of PR as they are heavily and regularly in demand. Real weddings promote your product and services to couples, but are also great for helping develop professional relationships and sources of referrals. Be prepared with permission to publish, complete background stories from the couple and vendor lists, and a list of important deadlines and publisher specifications. And always choose real weddings that promote the kind of work you want to attract. RealWeds.com, WeddingWire’s submission website, is a great place to start.

If you’re a great writer (or have one on staff), you might consider pursuing guest blogging opportunities as well. Editors love an outside perspective and access to great content that their readers will love. Don’t hesitate to reach out when you have something to offer to an audience you want to meet.

 

HARO

When you are ready to expand beyond real weddings, you’ll want to familiarize yourself with Help A Reporter Out (better known as HARO, or the PR guru’s Secret Sauce!). Every day, multiple times each day, HARO sends out a completely free digest of requests from legitimate reporters seeking sources for digital, print and television news features. Topics are high interest and enormously varied, and wedding-related pieces come up frequently. Monitor HARO regularly, and when you see an opportunity that you know is a great fit that will further your goals, follow the directions for contacting the reporter and share your expert commentary or advice as requested. Some truly amazing opportunities originate on HARO, and you’re certainly a perfect fit for one (or more) of them.

 

Ready to Begin?

Once you’ve honed your goals and message, chosen your target media, and prepared your pitches, the only to-do left is to put yourself out there! Don’t wait to take your business to the next level. Start today!

» Do You Hate (The Boring Parts of) Your Wedding Pro Job?

alan bergThis article was written by WeddingWire Education Guru Alan Berg, CSP. Alan has over 20 years experience in wedding related sales and marketing, and is an author, business consultant, a member of the National Speakers Association, and the wedding & event industry’s only Certified Speaking Professional®. Learn more at alanberg.com.

I once heard a very famous speaker friend say on-stage: “I hate my job!” We, in the audience, were very surprised, until he continued that he loves speaking, he just hates all of the other things related to his work: prospecting, administration, sales, etc. Sound familiar? Do you love the creative parts of your work, but hate the business parts? Many wedding pros I meet feel that way.

Love it or hate it, those business tasks are what separate a hobby from a business. When I started selling wedding advertising many years ago, I remember visiting with a wedding photographer in his studio. His bookshelf had lots of photography books, but it also had business books. While his work was very good, there were other, more artistic photographers in his market. That said, he had a better, more viable business than many of the more artistic photographers, because he understood that he also needed business skills.

What are you good at?

Which parts of your business are you best at doing? Chances are, you didn’t say sales and marketing. If you did, good for you! If not, then what are you doing to enhance your business skills? Are you attending conferences like WeddingWire World? When I started giving presentations at conferences many years ago, the business sessions were lightly attended, compared to the sessions on improving your craft (floral arranging, video editing, etc.).

Over the years, I’m pleased to see more business content become available and more people choosing to attend. After all, you can have the best creative skills and not have a viable business. If you have great business skills, you can always hire the creative talent. When it comes to the business tasks, you can either learn to do them better or outsource them. I know how to do my accounting, but I use a CPA to do my taxes. They’re up on the latest laws and deductions, and have proven their worth to me, over and over, through their actions. I understand graphic design, but I hire a professional graphic designer, because they’re more creative than me. I understand website design, and I’ve written a book on websites, but I use a professional website designer for the more technical aspects, which are not my strength.

 

TGIF or TGIM?

In the 9-5 world, you hear TGIF from people who are looking forward to Friday, because it’s the end of their work week. In the wedding industry, Friday is the beginning of your work. Sure, you’ve been preparing for these weddings for weeks, or months, but you get to see the culmination of your work on the weekend. Yes, weddings can happen on other days, but the recent WeddingWire Newlywed Report said that, in 2016, 22 days accounted for half of all weddings. They were all Saturdays, and the 3 most popular dates were all in October. So, I can say, with confidence, that the weekend is likely when you’re performing your services.

Do you look forward to Friday, TGIF, because you’re excited about being able to bring to fruition your hard work, and to show your couples, and their guests, an amazing experience? Or, do you say TGIM, Thank Goodness It’s Monday, because your work is done? Yes, there’s a sense of relief in knowing that the wedding went off, hopefully without a hitch. Yes, there’s a sense of satisfaction in delivering your products and services, at a high-level, and having your customers pleased with the results. That said, some of you don’t get to see the faces of the guests, as they arrive at the wedding, or as they dance the night away. You deliver the tent, tables, flowers and décor, before the first guest arrives. You see brides in their dresses, in your shop, but not at the wedding (until they post or send you photos). You see grooms in their tuxes and suits, but not at the wedding. You see the invitations, but not the look on their guest’s faces when they go to their mailboxes and then open, with anticipation, the first impression of their wedding. So, do you look forward to delivering your service, or for the relief of it being over?

 

Inner pride

The most intense sense of pride comes from within. Yes, it’s nice to have others say your work is great. Yes, it’s gratifying to see their wonderful reviews. But, as I said on my recent WeddingWire EDU webinar, “Your ROI (Return on Investment) is in the WHY,” you should work the same, whether anyone sees you or not. Satisfaction of a job well done should be internal first. Know that you’ve done the absolute best you could for that customer. Take pride in that, and then look for validation from the couple and their guests.

Like it, or not, not everyone posts a photo or review. You often get little or no feedback from your customer, and rarely from the guests (unless you’re physically at the wedding). While there’s no shortage of egos in the wedding industry, your first goal is to feed your family, then feed your ego. Do what’s right, because it’s the right thing to do, not because anyone will notice. Then, get validation that you did, through their photos, social posts and reviews. So, love your job, or hate it (and outsource more of it), feel very blessed we’re in an industry that allows us to share our creativity on one of the most special days of their lives. TGIF!

» Just in Time for Pride! The LGBTQ Planning Guide

lgbtq planning guide

June is when we celebrate everything lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer (LGBTQ), so we’re excited to share our first LGBTQ Planning Guide with you. It’s a great resource for clients (and potential clients) planning same-sex weddings with lots of wedding inspiration and practical advice to get started.

Here’s a bit of what you can expect from the guide:

» How to create your perfect wedding vendor team: It takes a village to bring any wedding vision to life, so we break down a few of the important players in the wedding planning journey.

»Fun facts about LGBTQ couples: A lot has changed since the Supreme Court of the United States recognized marriage equality on June 26, 2015, so we added some data from our 2016 Contemporary Couples Survey.

»A quick start checklist: Inspiration is great, but you also have start wedding planning. Our quick guide helps same-sex couples prioritize so they’re not overwhelmed.

Check out the guide for more!

» 6 Easy Tips for Self-Care During Wedding Season

self-care during busy season

Wedding season is a constant flurry of activity with early mornings and long nights for most wedding professionals. With so much focus on work, this can leave your energy, health, enthusiasm and creativity drained. That’s where “self-care” comes in. According to GoodTherapy.org, a directory of therapists operated by an association of mental health professionals, self-care includes “actions that an individual might take in order to reach optimal physical and mental health.”

These actions can take many forms and will vary depending on what peak health means to you. We’ve listed some common activities you can do on a busy day to practice self-care during peak season.

Make a cup of tea (or Joe, or cocoa): Hear us out! Hot drinks aren’t very popular in the summer months, but a warm mug of decaf tea or coffee is a great way to unwind and relax for a few minutes at the end of a busy day. Beyond the soothing experience of sipping on a steaming beverage, the ritual of preparing tea (or the drink of your choice) will help you to decompress during the busy season.  

Find time for a walk: As a creative professional, you’re probably up and about for most of the day, so this isn’t necessarily a walk for exercise. Rather, use this walk as an opportunity to take a few deep breaths, enjoy the warm weather and not think about work. Even if you have a full day of appointments or weddings, try to carve out at least five or 10 minutes to stroll and be alone.

Stretch it out: The benefits of practicing yoga are well-documented, but who has the time for a 60-minute class when you’re a fully booked pro? Thankfully, you can still reap the benefits of yoga — relaxation, mental clarity and stress relief  — without executing dozens of perfect vinyasas. Start or end your day with a few simple stretches or yoga poses, if you know some. It’s not so much about what you do, but taking the time to do it, that will help you to claim some of the benefits.

Grab a kid, a partner or a best friend: Essentially, anyone who’ll give you a hug and put a smile on your face. One of the first things that busy people tend to do is cancel dinner plans, skip family gatherings and begin to send calls to voicemail. It may seem counterintuitive, but when you’re really busy, especially for a prolonged period of time, you need your social network even more to keep you happy and healthy. As this wedding season approaches, consider scheduling a regular date night with your love or putting time on the calendar to call your friends in other cities. Trust us, you’ll want all the belly laughs you can manage to get you through the season!

Tap into your creativity: You got into this business because you wanted to do creative things, so be sure you don’t lose sight of your creativity this wedding season. As often as your schedule allows, spark your creative juices by reading your favorite photography books, flipping through fashion magazines, checking out the latest makeup trends or any other activity that relates to your craft. You can also use this time to peak into how other industries are translating new trends in technology, color, texture or materials. Though it may seem indulgent during your busy wedding season, soaking up inspiration and being creative will help you weather this wedding season.

Enjoy the weather! How ironic that wedding professionals spend nearly every summer weekend working long, long days? Don’t let the warm weather pass you by, no matter how busy you are. Take the time now to schedule some time to drive to the beach, attend an outdoor concert or movie or fire up the grill with friends and family. Whatever your favorite summer activity, be sure you have time to indulge in it before Labor Day.

These suggestions are just a start. Take the time to brainstorm a few of your favorite activities that help you recharge and how you can be sure to make time for them this wedding season.

» How Should You Politely Tell A Client ‘I Don’t Do That’?

It’s a near universal fact of life as a creative professional that sometimes your taste and unique skills just don’t line up with the trend of the moment. So, first off, you’re not alone. Trends can be set pretty arbitrarily sometimes—a celebrity is seen in some wildly off-kilter style and suddenly everyone in their sphere of influence wants that look. Other times, pure necessity or genuine concern or simply aesthetics dictate a trend. Whatever the reason, there might be times when the wedding trend of the moment isn’t something you feel comfortable doing. Maybe you’re a baker who doesn’t believe that naked cakes are a good representation of your skills. Or, perhaps, you’re a florist who just hasn’t mastered floral crowns, and therefore doesn’t feel comfortable offering them as a product just yet.

All of this brings us to the potential client request. How should you politely tell a potential client, “Thanks, but that trend really isn’t up my alley”? Here are some suggestions.

Be Very Gracious. We’re sure you are always thankful for inquiries, but it never hurts to have a reminder that every inquiry from a potential client means you’re one of a few in the running for that couple’s business. For that reason, start any response with appreciation for their time and a sincere thank you. Regardless of whether you end up becoming a part of their wedding team, you’re learning something about new people and expanding your network, so yay!

Don’t Insult Their Taste. Aesthetics and personal taste are in the eyes of the beholder, so just because you personally don’t stock lucite chairs, that doesn’t mean that the correct way to address a potential client is a diatribe about how tacky you think they are. Same goes for skimpy wedding gowns, multi-colored wedding hair or any other client request that might run afoul of your personal taste.

Be Transparent. Of course, you want to salvage the sale, even if the client is gung-ho about 12 flower crowns for the wedding party, or if the couple insists on a naked cake that you don’t like doing. But, it’s a great business practice to be honest and transparent with your potential clients. For that reason, in the most polite way possible, just tell the truth. However, don’t stop at, “I apologize, but naked cakes aren’t a part of my offerings.” Don’t be afraid to have a quick explanation for the why. This way, potential clients see this is a thoughtful decision on your part, and not just an excuse for not doing something you don’t like to do.

Offer an Alternative. Now comes the time when you want to rescue the sale. It’s important to stay abreast of wedding trends so if this moment comes, you have enough knowledge of other, similar trends to offer up as an alternative. For example, while naked cakes enjoyed a moment in the sun, “nearly naked” cakes are a happy medium for some that are created in the spirit of the trend while not being such an exact interpretation. As huge trends take off in your service category, if you feel that they’re not something you’re comfortable creating, try to think of your version or an alternative that might satisfy some clients.

» 5 Questions Couples Should Ask Wedding Pros (But Don’t)

As the wedding professional, each time you meet with a new couple, you’re the expert. Chances are, they haven’t hosted a wedding before, and their level of expertise with pulling off an event of this size extends only to being a member of someone else’s wedding party. With this in mind, your potential clients’ questions will likely be most focused on the aesthetics of bringing their wedding vision to life, which is great! However, it’s your job as the expert to be sure your couples are well-informed about some of the oft-forgotten aspects of hiring you.

Here are a few questions you’ll want to be sure to answer, even if your client doesn’t know or doesn’t remember to ask.

Can you describe your style?/Can I see some of your work? This one is a bit tricky, as most likely your potential client has seen photos of your weddings on WeddingWire and may have even popped over to your Instagram profile to check out more of your aesthetic. Even with that being the case, you want to take the opportunity to describe and show your style, why you approach your work the way you do and how you help couples visions come to life. This is also an opportunity for you to tailor your portfolio to your couple. For example, if you know they’re planning a rustic wedding, pull out some examples of rustic weddings you’ve done in the past. If you know they’re going for a modern, trendy wedding look, show that you’ve created those kinds of weddings as well.

Do you have a list of preferred vendors? Unless you’re a wedding venue, chances are you don’t have hard-and-fast lists of wedding professionals with which you strongly prefer to work. Still, if you’re a photographer who has done a dozen weddings with a great videographer, it’s worth mentioning. If you’re a wedding planner who has a couple of florists who seamlessly pull your vision to life, let your potential client know. One of the most difficult aspects of wedding planning can be sourcing a team of wedding professionals, so helping your clients by recommending great pros who work well with each other is worthwhile. You’ll need to bring this up, as your potential client may not be aware that wedding pros frequently work together.

What other fees am I expected to cover? Most likely, your potential client is looking at the “base” price to determine how your services will fit into their wedding budget, but there might be other, smaller fees that they should be aware of. These are highly dependent on the service category, but could include overtime fees, setup and/or delivery fees, breakdown fees and any number of practical costs for your additional services, time or equipment. Once your client has chosen which service they’d like, be sure to mention fees that you know they’ll incur, as well as any optional fees that might come into effect (like overtime).

Can I review this contract with my parents, future-in-laws or anyone else who is paying for it? Sometimes, the entire family will come for a venue tour or a cake tasting. Other times, only the couple or maybe even only one member of the couple will meet you for the initial visit. However, most weddings involve a whole team of people who are making decisions and fronting the costs. For this reason, it’s important to try to suss out who the important stakeholders might be for each client and try to be on the up-and-up with those people as well. So, if you know your couple’s flowers are being paid for by a groom’s mother, be sure she’s involved before the contract is signed. Not only will this likely make the wedding planning process easier for your clients, but you’ll be working toward a more satisfied client once the service is complete.

Who will be my 24/7 contact person? If you’re a one-person business, this is an easy thing to mention to your new clients. If you’re a larger business with a separate team to handle sales and events, this is trickier. No matter the structure of your business, you want to be sure your client knows who will be their point person throughout the planning along with who will be the point person for other wedding pros they will hire in the future. As the wedding approaches, you may want to offer a few different ways to get in touch — maybe a text or email after hours — so that as things pop up, your client feels comfortable letting you know about them.

» 4 Easy Steps to Content Creation as a Wedding Pro

When it comes to marketing and PR for your company, content creation is king – especially if you’re the one creating it. It’s no secret that Google loves fresh, well-written and continually updated new content on a blog, rewarding it with higher rankings and greater chance for attention.

If establishing yourself as an expert is part of your master business plan, one of the expectations is that you will provide new, enriching content regularly via your own blog and through partnerships with other media outlets. So how do you create exciting and valuable new content as a wedding pro?

Outline your goals. Ask yourself, “What do I hope to accomplish by focusing more of my time on content creation?” You want to make sure you have a purpose and it’s clear what sort of Return on Investment (ROI) will qualify your content strategy as a success.

content creation

 

Begin creating a content calendar. Determine where you’re posting – which social media, blogs, and guest writing opportunities – as well as how often, keeping in mind that your goals should be manageable.

Figure out what you’ll write about. How, you ask? Host a brainstorming session with your team. Take notes after wedding days on scenarios you can turn into a list of tips for couples. Carve out a brief amount of time weekly to review mainstream press, like your local daily newspaper or The New York Times. Then ask yourself how it can relate to the event industry. Cover company news and industry news. Provide valuable content to your audience with the intention of getting closer to your goals.

Track your progress and revisit statistics quarterly. Ensure that your content remains aligned with your goals. Review your responsibilities and commitments and ask yourself if it’s still feasible to create as much content as you’re doing. Use your analytics to see what posts (social media, blog, others) end up with the most engagements and click-throughs to your site. The best plan is one that evolves and addresses what your audience wants and needs.

Content creation requires commitment and analysis. Done well, it can yield new business opportunities, increased attention to your work, and advancement in the industry of your recognition as an expert. Make a plan, review your goals and achievements, and don’t be afraid to take the leap – start building your content portfolio today.

 

Exclusive Wedding PR Education Expert for WeddingWire Meghan Ely is the owner of wedding PR agency OFD Consulting. She also leads the newly launched OFD Collective, a membership based community of wedding professionals seeking PR education and publicity opportunities for their business.

» How to Set Your Prices Based on Your Value

I was just at the Photo Booth Expo, and as you can imagine, there were many, many different types of equipment there. Features varied, as did prices. I was speaking with a couple that owns seven photo booths, and they were considering a new mirror booth. There were a couple of different ones they were considering, but one was a lot more expensive than the other. While the quality of the more expensive one was evident, they were torn on which one to buy.

 

Customers buy value, not price. 

My advice? No matter which one they decide to buy, they should charge the same price to rent it out. My statement confused them, as the more expensive booth was more than double the price to buy. Customers aren’t going to have them side-by-side. They’re not going to know what you didn’t buy. They’re only going to know what you bring to their wedding or event. And, most importantly, they’re not paying you for the equipment. They’re paying you for the outcome, which is the fun their guests are going to have at their wedding or event.

This is true for every product and service. While you need to know your costs, you charge for the outcome. Photographers and videographers have many choices of equipment. Most couples wouldn’t be able to tell the difference between photos shot with a Canon camera versus a Nikon. DJs and bands have many choices of equipment. Most customers couldn’t tell the difference between JBL speakers and Bose. Caterers have infinite choices of kitchen equipment, yet the customer gives no thought to how the food is cooked, just that it wows their guests.

 

How do you set your prices?

When you’re deciding how much to charge for your products and services, how do you go about it? Do you take your costs and charge a multiple (3X cost, 5X cost)? Do you even know your costs? Have you taken into consideration your overhead (rent, utilities, insurance, etc.)? Whether it’s envelopes, toilet paper or paper clips, the money to pay for that has to come from your gross sales.

 

If you don’t value your time, no one will.

Too many wedding pros undervalue their time—do you? Do you know how much time it takes to perform your services? Have you included the time it takes to answer emails, take phone calls, and meet in-person (or virtually)? I was sitting with a DJ who was lamenting to me about another inquiry that asked for his “5-hour package.” We started talking about how much time he actually spends on each wedding, from the initial inquiry through any appointments, planning meetings/calls, editing music for each introduction and their first dance, planning their playlist (and do-not-play list) – then the packing up and travel time to their wedding, the wedding itself and then packing up, the time getting home and unpacking. He figured that it was between 35 and 40 hours.

How much is your 5-hour package?

So, I suggested that the next time someone asks about his 5-hour package, he reply, something like this: “Thanks so much for giving me the opportunity to show you how much fun I can make your wedding. I’d love to pack your dance floor, and have your guests saying it was the best wedding they’ve ever attended. I don’t have a 5-hour package, but I’d love to tell you about my 35-hour package – the 5 hours you and your guests will see – and the other 30 hours that I’ll be investing, before your wedding, to ensure its success, which you can see from our dozens of fantastic reviews.” 

Are you charging only for the time you spend at their wedding? Or, are you taking into account all of the other time you’re going to invest in them? Too many wedding and event pros set their prices based upon what someone else is charging. How do you know their prices are correct? You don’t. Do you know their costs? No. Do you have the same overhead? No. What if their prices are too low (as they often are)? Don’t chase them to the bottom.

Over the years, I’ve challenged many of you to justify your current prices. Can you raise you prices now? Not sure? Ask yourself this: If your prices were 5% higher, last year, how many of your customers would have said “No”? If the answer is none, or very few, your prices are too low. You’re undervaluing yourself. When you get to the point where some are saying “No,” but there would be others who would say, “Yes,” to the higher price, then you can still raise your prices. When you get to the point where too many would be saying “No,” and others would also say, “No,” then you’ve gone too far.

 

Raising your rates isn’t as difficult as it seems.

Early this year I got an email from a wedding pro: “I put one of your suggestions into action right after the seminar, and increased my servicing fees by $15 per hour, and NOT ONE PERSON objected. Many thanks from my family, because it really was that easy to put an extra $1500 in our family pocket, which means winter holiday in Mexico, NOT Vancouver Island LOL.” Another wedding pro, a DJ, doubled his prices during one of my presentations, and the next day he sold two weddings at the higher prices! He hadn’t raised his prices in years, and had gotten comfortable selling at the lower price, because it was easy. Now, he finds it just as easy to sell at the higher price.

 

How much money are you leaving on the table?

Every dollar you raise your prices is extra profit. Conversely, every dollar you discount your prices is profit you’re giving away. Take a good, hard look at your pricing structure, then ask yourself those questions about how many would say. “No” to higher prices. Next, see how much more profit you can gain. I look forward to hearing your stories of success!

 

alan bergThis article was written by WeddingWire Education Guru Alan Berg, CSP. Alan has over 20
years experience in wedding related sales and marketing, and is an author, business consultant, a member of the National Speakers Association, and the wedding & event industry’s only Certified Speaking Professional®. Learn more at alanberg.com

» How and When to Start Expanding for Business Growth

Business growth means something different to everyone but, in most cases, it’s a step in the right direction. However, it’s important that a company’s growth comes at the right time in order to be successful; otherwise, you may find that your company is growing faster than your schedule and financial resources can afford.

For this reason, it’s important for business owners to map out their growth plan so they have an idea of when and how they will be able to accommodate the added work that comes with a next-level business. The decision to grow is not one to be taken lightly, so come into your development with an open mind and a step-by-step plan.

If you’ve thought hard about it and decided that growing your business is the direction you want to take, you’ll want to be sure to have a team on hand to guide you throughout the transition. Even if you’re a solopreneur, don’t feel like you have to do this alone. Start by finding a business coach who can help you develop your next step (whether it’s bringing on employees or adding a new service), while still maintaining the brand you’ve worked so hard to create. An accountant and/or financial advisor are other great additions to have on the team, as you will see a change in your finances and will need to ensure your solvency.

business growth wedding professionals wedding vendor

Prior to expanding your business in any way, it’s important to be sure your business has policies and procedures in place to ensure things run smoothly and consistently regardless of where you are in your journey. For example, if you plan on bringing on new team members, have an onboarding guide in place to help them through the first few weeks of their employment.

Even if bringing on employees isn’t a part of your plan, chances are it will be a decision down the line if your business continues to grow. One person can only do so much! Once you’ve gathered more clients or are offering more services, it may make sense to hire an assistant to help you with the business administration side of things.

As your company develops, be sure that you are open and honest about changes with your industry peers, as well as your clients. Transparency is the key to building trust among your network, so don’t think about launching a new product or starting a side-hustle without communicating your intentions to your target audiences.

With some careful planning and a lot of honest ambition, you are sure to push your business to the next level in no time! Remember that everyone’s timeline is different, so don’t feel pressured by competitors or other companies in your industry. Growth should be organic, so stick to what feels right.

This post was written by Jennifer Taylor. Jennifer Taylor is the owner of Taylor’d Events Group, a planning firm that specializes in celebrations of all kinds in the Pacific Northwest and Maui. She is also the creator of The Taylor’d Plan, a self-administered class for wedding planners who are new to the industry and looking to grow and develop their skills.

» What to Do If You (Accidentally) Double Book Clients

wedding professional double book clients

It happens to the best of us. You’re so excited to work with a new client that you say an enthusiastic “yes!” before realizing that you already have a client commitment that day. An accidental double book is easy to stumble into, particularly when you have a sudden surge in interest from potential clients. So, don’t worry, here’s how to fix it, if you do find yourself double-booked.

 

1. Find someone who is available.
The most important thing to do is to take care of the client you inadvertently said “yes” to. As soon as you figure out you can’t service their wedding, let them know. But, it’s not enough to just say, “sorry,” you also should go the extra step and find someone who is available on that day. This is where you reach into your trusty bag of fellow wedding professionals who are fantastic, message around for someone who is available and arrange a replacement. Of course, it’s up to your client if they decide to book the replacement, but you want to do the legwork for them.

 

2. Make it right.
Depending on your service category, it’s a great gesture of goodwill to offer something to the person who you’ve bumped from your calendar. This could be sending a nice floral arrangement, if you’re a florist; offering to snap rehearsal dinner photos at a discounted rate if you’re a photographer or some other service of value to the couple as they’re wedding planning. Besides showing that you’re apologetic, it can help to mitigate any damage to your reputation with the couple (and their network of friends, family and co-workers who might hear the story of the wedding pro who cancelled).

 

3. Prevent snafus in the future.
Business challenges are the best learning experiences for the future. Once you’ve double-booked once, you will probably never do it again, because you’ll have the distinct memory of this experience as your teacher. To make sure you’re keeping up with your calendar, try to get into the habit of writing down and scheduling all of the tasks needed to service a client—not just the hours you’ll be on-site for the event. This can include site visits, walk-throughs, meeting with other vendors who will be working on the event, creating mood boards or inspiration palettes, editing after the fact or a myriad of other events, depending on your service category. Think about the total time commitment of each client, and be realistic with how long it will take you to dedicate yourself to that wedding. This will help you have a good idea of when you are actually available for a wedding and when you’re really not.

 

4. Consider forming a partnership or collective.
Creative professionals thrive on collaboration, so why not consider sharing the load by creating a partnership or team of professionals in your service category? Beyond being a sounding board for ideas and expanding your network, these professionals might be helpful when you have a great client who you just don’t have the time to take on. Having a group of professionals with the same standards, a similar aesthetic and creative approach is the best-case scenario for a couple that needs to replace a wedding pro who has accidentally double-booked.

» How Are Weddings Changing? WeddingWire 2017 Newlywed Survey

WeddingWire 2017 Newlywed Report It’s that time again—the WeddingWire 2017 Newlywed Survey is here! This year, we surveyed more than 13,000 couples that wed in 2016 to learn about their weddings and what was most important to them.

Read the full survey here >>

Here are some of the big changes:

1. Technology matters: Couples now spend 50% of their time planning from a smartphone (up from 30% last year).

2. Uniformity is out: Bridesmaids are more likely to wear non-matching than in previous years, a trend we’ve seen continue to grow.

3. While the average wedding price tag hasn’t grown, millennials spend a bit more: $31,000 on average.

 

But, some things are staying put:

1. The average price of a wedding is still about $28,000. Spend on honeymoons ($4,000) and engagement rings ($5,000) is also about the same as last year.

2. The first dance continues to be the most popular tradition for all couples, but same-sex couples are less likely to perform one.

3. The average number of wedding guests for straight couples is 124, just four more than last year. For same-sex couples, it’s 100.

There’s lots more information for wedding pros, so check out the full survey!